WiseTouch Equine Bodywork

WiseTouch Equine Bodywork WiseTouch Equine Bodywork is dedicated to sharing & applying beneficial equine massage therapy, enhancing the health & quality of your horses.

WiseTouch Equine Bodywork is located in Oregon, Wisconsin and provides high quality equine massage in the Madison, WI and surrounding area. Maintenance, preventative, pre & post event massage.
$65 Initial Consultation (90min)
$55 Single Session (60min)
$30 4-H Special (60min)

Operating as usual

Weekend learning-I found it is helpful to watch correct moving horses, to help me identify what is not moving correctly....
03/16/2019
The Anatomy of Movement - Equine Wellness Magazine

Weekend learning-I found it is helpful to watch correct moving horses, to help me identify what is not moving correctly. Understanding how all of the muscles are working together. Photography myself to see where my seat/balance is and great friends who keep reminding me of how I'm riding good or bad. Keeps me learning.

I hope you enjoy the article.

Movement is what horses are all about. In fact, they evolved from the fox terrier- sized Eohippus of 55 million years ago mostly because of their ability to move. Movement is still essential to every horse’s nature and even his life. A horse that cannot move is a horse in trouble. The Anatomy of G...

01/15/2019

I will be at the Jefferson Tack sale on Sunday, come see what is available for your health and your horses. Learn what new techniques I will be learning this year. See examples of what to look for when your horse is using his/her hind end and base of neck properly. Wish me a Happy Birthday

01/02/2019

Happy New Year!!!
For 2019, I will be continuing to work on acupressure certification. I will also be taking a course in Myofascial Release. Continuing my biomechanics learning from Jillian and riding with KT Barry and Patrick King.

As always-I love to talk, so give me a shout out.

12/07/2018

Merry Christmas 🎁
12 Days of Christmas Special
Thru Wednesday December 19th 2018

1 Hour Gift Certificate for $40, a $55 value

PM me name for Gift Certificate, and your email to send gift certificate. I can be PayPal at [email protected]

Once Payment is recieved I will email gift certificate.

Thank You from WiseTouch

Some of my clients have also seen a better recovery benefit, when having an extended stall rest. Less stress, and able t...
10/06/2018
The Benefits of Equine Massage Therapy

Some of my clients have also seen a better recovery benefit, when having an extended stall rest. Less stress, and able to transition back to light work easily.

Equine massage therapy continues to gain popularity, and with good reason.

I'm sure we all have learned this. I've just spent a lot of time unlearning. I've noticed that, not only does it create ...
07/15/2018
heels down

I'm sure we all have learned this. I've just spent a lot of time unlearning. I've noticed that, not only does it create the brace in my body, it can create one in the horse. Can cause some postural issues in both horse & human. What helped me was finding neutral, see Connected Riding-Peggy Cummings for more or pm me.

CRK Training, LLC Copyright © 2018

Super excited to announce, I will be going to my 1st acupressure course this month for certification from Tallgrass. I w...
04/10/2018

Super excited to announce, I will be going to my 1st acupressure course this month for certification from Tallgrass. I would like to share this video for shoulder release acupressure from Dr Kerry Ridgeway, this is just some of what I will be able to add to your horses massage.

Watch the Video Below!

Shoulder relief, freedom of movement and straightness.. Learn the acupressure point in the video clip below and help your horse!

Dr. Ridgway's lung 1 + is a really important acupuncture/acupressure wellness point which releases and resolves pain in the shoulder and barrel. It is a very good point to stimulate and incorporate in any horse's training routine as it promotes muscle comfort and shoulder freedom before even getting in the saddle-- thus helping the rider develop the horse's straightness without stress.

This educational video clip demonstrates how to find the point in detail:

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/improvedhorseperformance

click on the screen to watch the trailer.

DISCLAIMER: If you are not an equine health professional, please ask a qualified equine health professional to teach you the techniques shown in the video series that are appropriate for amateurs and let them do the mobilization, alignment, acupuncture/acupressure, bodywork techniques that requires a professional education in equine health and/or integrated veterinary medicine.

To learn more about Dr. Ridgway's work, please check ProudHorse Connections:

www.proudhorseconnections.com

For fantastic streaming videos of Dr. Ridgway’s saddle fitting course and ulcer courses please go to:

http://www.drkerryridgway.com

03/27/2018
Recognizing Engagement: Training Your Eye

Recently, I've been studying, engagement, collection, self carriage. How to recognize it and explain it. This 4 min video by equitopia, explains engagement well. Take note, that the horse in engagement, you will see a parallelogram of the legs. Have fun watching and learning. More to come...

Equitopia www.EquitopiaCenter.com presents "Recognizing Engagement: Training Your Eye." Trainer Karen Loshbaugh demonstrates what to look for when a horse is...

Passing on Iron Gate Equine'sInformation on ice in the barn yard, how to handle it, and suggestions on what to do if you...
03/01/2018
Slip Sliding Away

Passing on Iron Gate Equine's
Information on ice in the barn yard, how to handle it, and suggestions on what to do if your horse falls and can't get up.

As all of this rainwater freezes, our horses are at risk of falling on icy paths and pastures. Here are some ways to prevent this from happening, and what to do if it does happen.

I always wondered how the nose band affected the tmj & mouth. I've used them. The article sheds more information on use.
02/27/2018

I always wondered how the nose band affected the tmj & mouth. I've used them. The article sheds more information on use.

• What does a noseband do?

• Do riders know WHY they use them?

• More importantly, is the desired outcome truely being achieved by the action of using them?

I have found all cases of horses nashing, opening the mouth, being inconsistent or heavy in the contact, head tilting, hollowing, etc, is about having the correct bit that the horse finds comfortable. It is also about the riders hands & the way they use them to communicate via the horses mouth. These are the two things that need correction/attention & NOT the addition of a noseband.

So to correct a horses ‘mouth’ you shouldn't try to ‘stop’ an undesirable trait with restriction (i.e.: tighten the noseband, or worse still, tighten a secondary strap below the bit) - this would cause further discomfort & resistance for something the horse is already expressing is not comfortable, therefore it cannot accept it with a quiet mouth.

And a quiet mouth is NOT a ‘shut mouth’. No living mammal on earth goes around with it’s jaw closed & teeth together - it must remain relaxed & open. Optimum performance cannot happen any other way.

Therefore the conclusion is simple - the noseband really should be a fashion piece, treated like a browband - it serves no purpose/benefit to be ‘used’ to do anything, as any tightness or restriction from a noseband simply makes peak performance impossible. Any horses ‘winning’ with this gear…. imagine how amazing they would truely be WITH A LOOSE NOSEBAND! & here is why:

Did you know:

– On an equine dissection (yes, like an autopsy) any pressure applied in the horses mouth or to the jaw (which causes the hyoid bone at the base of the tongue to move up and/or back in the jaw) renders the hind legs restricted (difficult to move by a human) with effects also evident in the hips, yet the leg can be freely moved when the jaw is released (when the hyoid bone is allow to sit lower & forward in the jaw/mouth). This is fact.

– The job of the jaw is to act like a pendulum to give the horse correct balance & allows the horse to have awareness of limb placement. This relies on the TMJ (temporomandibular joint) of the jaw to be pain & pressure free.

– The jaw of the horse is a reflection of the pelvis. If the jaw is stuck, the horses pelvis will be too. This is seen in the obvious evasion of head tilting to allow the pelvis to move if the jaw cannot.

– closing the mouth & closing the gullet (over-bent) when riding causes the hyoid bone of the tongue to become blocked, which is directly connected to & tightens the muscles at the base of the neck through to the chest. This also makes it hard for the horse to swallow - causing excessive saliva/foam to pour from the horses mouth.

So in light of these facts - here is the positive side of having a loose, caveson noseband (or none at all!):

+ The horses mouth becomes a reflection of it’s acceptance of the reins aids & how much they understand the communication of their rider

+ The horse has nothing to resist against - as there is no restriction.

+ A calm yet mobile mouth means they are light on the reins & relaxed through the neck so they can easily swallow

+ Freedom to the jaw will allow freedom in the pelvis & hind legs

+ Your horse has 100% chance of giving you it’s best performance!

It’s time we all stopped just using items of gear, because that’s what they sell in the shops ~ but really think about how we are trying to train our horses to understand us & give them the best chance of producing what we really want ~ HARMONY

© Love Your Horse

Always a better understanding, helps us make the best decisions for our equine friends.
01/15/2018
16 Fascinating Facts About Horse Digestion

Always a better understanding, helps us make the best decisions for our equine friends.

This probably comes as no surprise, but the horse is a unique animal. This is especially true when it comes to how they digest food. Classified as non-ruminant herbivores, horses’ digestive systems are a cross between a monogastric animal (like a dog or human) and a ruminant (like a cow or goat). ...

Interesting research about elastic on our girths and horse physiology. Makes me think about the number of different girt...
11/11/2017
7 Facts About Girths Your Horse Wants You to Know

Interesting research about elastic on our girths and horse physiology. Makes me think about the number of different girths ive had throughout the years.

Elastic on the girth hinders saddle security. Bloating does not. Tension fluctuates with pace. Forget everything you think you know about girths. The research is in and it goes against almost every belief horse people hold dear. *Special thanks to the ever inquisitive Russell Guire of Centaur Biomec...

A wonderful weekend spent at the William Fox-Pitt Symposium. The booth looked great. Talked to lots of great people. Wil...
11/07/2017

A wonderful weekend spent at the William Fox-Pitt Symposium. The booth looked great. Talked to lots of great people. William Fox-Pitt stopped in.
Thanks to WDCTA for putting this on, and William Fox-Pitt, they did a great job

When I stretch, I find my ride is better.  I'm more relaxed. Try these 3 stretches and give me feedback on your ride.
08/16/2017
3 Stretches Every Rider Should Be Doing (Like RN)

When I stretch, I find my ride is better. I'm more relaxed. Try these 3 stretches and give me feedback on your ride.

Riders are athletes. Shouldn’t we train for the sport like one? Start with this stretching guide, courtesy of our friends at Thunderbird Show Park in Langley, BC, the boutique show that puts horse and human athletes first—every time.  Pop quiz! What sport gives you the arms of Michelle Obama, thighs...

05/13/2017

Many have questions on massage, what if, will it do this, can I? The following PDF is some common FAQS

1. How long does it take to give a horse a massage?

Generally, 40 minutes to an hour and a half. A great deal depends on the horse. Is this the first massage? It will take longer. How often are massages given? The longer you go between scheduling a massage, the longer it can take as there are more reactive areas to contend with. Horses that are on a regular massage schedule generally take around 40 minutes to an hour at most. Their muscles are in good condition. Many troublesome areas are worked out and the massage goes quickly and very pleasantly for both therapist and horse.�
2. Can I ride or work my horse before the massage?

No. It is best for the horse's muscles to be "cold". In other words, give at least 2-3 hours (preferably 3-4) after a workout before you schedule your massage therapist to arrive. We simply cannot do the same job with a horse when you have scheduled a workout just previously to the massage. Also, the reactivity level will be different. With a hot horse, which I have been given in the past, a therapist can do very little at that time. Basically, your therapist can perform a cool down massage, which will not be nearly as therapeutic as if the horse's muscles were "cold."�
3. Can I ride my horse after the massage?

Yes! Riding or working after a massage is acceptable and perfectly fine. Horses I am seeing for the first time, depending on the individual horse and the level of reactivity that I found, I may suggest a light workout instead. On occasion, it is best to leave the horse rest with turn out only. I will advise the owner of such at that time. But, most horses can go ahead about their business.��
4. I had a therapist come out one time and give my horse a massage. Boy! She just didn't seem to enjoy it at all. I don't think I will have a massage given again.

My mare just hated it.The first massage can be one of very mixed reactions. Basing the value of massage on just the first encounter is not really fair to therapist or horse. Some horses really get into at the get-go. Others, the therapist must move slowly and carefully, judging each reaction as they go along.Therapists are trained to get into areas of the muscle which may, indeed, be very reactive. The horse generally exhibits quite openly how they feel - good or bad. If you were to go to a professional massage therapist, you would then realize how they can find areas in your muscles that elicit a reaction from you that you didn't expect and other areas you did. Addressing these reactive areas doesn't always feel good. When a horse is that reactive, it clearly shows how seriously he was in need of massage. I have found the highest percentage improve greatly on succeeding massages until it takes no time at all and they are thoroughly enjoying the process. Long term muscle problems cannot be addressed all in one massage.�
5. How often does my horse need to have massage therapy?

Many horses do well with once per month. Race horses and others that are highly competitive in full training, may benefit from a more aggressive schedule. Much depends on how the horse is used, how often he is ridden, other physical problems he may have that contribute to muscle tension and, of course, your own personal budget. Initially, the horse may need massage more frequently to work out a long term problem. This may range from twice per week to twice per month, for instance, and will then return to a longer time frame between massages. One should always wait at least 3 days between massages.�
6. The massage is done. So now what? What happens next? Will I notice anything? Will it do anything bad to my horse?

One reaction that occasionally happens is hives. Massage releases toxins and some horses exhibit a short case of hives. It normally disappears quickly. Soreness can be an issue after a massage. We are addressing the soft tissues and sometimes this happens. In fact, we are addressing areas that were sore to begin with. This can create a little "healing crisis". This again, will quickly leave. Mostly, what you will notice are positive changes as you ride and work him. Massage will not do anything "bad" to your horse. It is a hands-on, non-invasive therapy. It is very beneficial when used properly.��
7. A friend of mine had her horse massaged and it came up lame afterwards. She claimed it was the massage that did that to the horse as it was perfectly alright before the massage. Is this true?

It is very possible that the horse came up lame after the massage. Did the massage make the horse lame? NO! The horse was already having problems and it wasn't all that noticeable to the owner even though there may have been small indications all along. Horses are masters at compensation. They can easily mask a problem. When a therapist begins to clear the muscle tension that develops from the compensation, you will begin to see where the problems are. A vet check is advisable to discover the cause. Addressing compensation problems is one of the positive benefits of massage.�
8. Should I have my veterinarian check over my horse before I have massage work done?

This is an excellent question. By all means, yes, please do. It is always a good idea. Any time there is injury, lameness issues, health issues or anything that you are in doubt about, a vet check is always advisable and preferred. Also, do not be surprised if I also advise a vet check depending on the information I have gathered on your horse. I may even refuse to work on the horse until you do. The rule of thumb is when in doubt, call your vet. Massage is an adjunctive therapy. It is not to replace veterinary care nor to be considered as a cure all. It does, however, work very well with most types of therapies and treatments and aids the healing process.�
9. What exactly does a massage therapist do to my horse? What is massage?

Massage is a hands-on therapy. It literally dates back to ancient times and has long been valued as a viable modality. We literally work from the head to the tail, using our hands to perform various techniques on the muscle, fascia, tendons and ligaments. Generally, this is accomplished with fingers, thumbs, elbows and hands. There are some massage tools that can be used, but these limit the sensitivity a therapist has regarding the "feel" of the horse and his reaction level. Hands-on is generally best.�
By Jeanette James

A Lesson In Letting Go - The Sacred Science
03/25/2017
A Lesson In Letting Go - The Sacred Science

A Lesson In Letting Go - The Sacred Science

In the middle of winter, there is a temptation to numb our senses while we wait for the flowers and bumblebees to come back in the spring.  But each season holds an equal amount of wisdom that is just waiting to be unlocked by those who are truly awake. Our ancestors had no choice but to …

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Oregon, WI
53575

Telephone

(608) 279-0411

Products

Initial Consultation 90min $65
Single Session 60min $55
4-Her's 60min $30
Half Session 30min $30
Tendon/Ligament Care $30

The Package Advantage
3 fully bodywork sessions $150

Farm/Group Package 3 or more
$45 ea

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