Trotter Creek Farm

Trotter Creek Farm Farm in Powhatan County, Virginia raising pastured pork and heritage breed animals - AKKPS registered Kunekune pigs, St Croix sheep, and poultry.

Our goal is to raise hardy stock suitable to pasture and to be as self-sufficient as possible.

Hey, that's our chicken! Thanks for sharing our photo!
03/19/2024

Hey, that's our chicken!
Thanks for sharing our photo!

Happy National Agriculture Day! 🐓🚜

Here in , we are still very much rural and strive to preserve our charming, small town feel. Let’s give a big shoutout to all of our working farmers and agricultural community right here in our community. 🧡

📸: Trotter Creek Farm

02/15/2024
Over the weekend, we received a deposit reserving our last available lambs for 2024. Thank you so much to our amazing cu...
02/05/2024

Over the weekend, we received a deposit reserving our last available lambs for 2024. Thank you so much to our amazing customers!

Our St. Croix sheep are 100% grass-fed with no supplemental grain, and the meat has exceptional flavor. Recently, we had a customer reserve 2 lamb shares because their family has really enjoyed the 2023 lamb they purchased.

According to the St. Croix Hair Sheep International Association website, “St. Croix sheep do not deposit fat within the muscles. Therefore, they produce a lean meat without the tallow taste associated with lanolin wool sheep. The flavor is mild. Taste tests conducted at Utah State University and published in articles in 2004 placed the meat quality of pure bred St. Croix in first place for the grades in flavor, juiciness and tenderness"

If you are interested in a lamb share for 2025, we should know what our availability will look like by early summer 2024, and we will be able to begin taking reservations at that time. Lamb is usually processed and available for customers in August. If you would like to be on our waiting list for lamb, you can send us a direct message here, or fill out a lamb inquiry on our website https://www.trottercreekfarm.com/grass-fed-lamb

We also currently have pastured pork available https://www.trottercreekfarm.com/pasturedpork

We are long overdue for an updated introduction post.Hi, we're Clayton and Kim, and we own and operate Trotter Creek Far...
01/31/2024

We are long overdue for an updated introduction post.

Hi, we're Clayton and Kim, and we own and operate Trotter Creek Farm, LLC. We're college sweethearts living out Clayton's lifelong dream of farming. 

I (Kim) run the social media and web side of the farm, homeschool our two kids, and try to keep up with the daily running of a home and homestead. Clayton works a full-time job and farms on the side. We both are very active in our church and its ministries, and Clayton coaches soccer in the spring and fall. It's a full life, but we love it!

We raise St. Croix sheep, pigs, rabbits, and a variety of chickens. We also employ two ridiculously cute pest control specialist cats and two diligent farm dog protectors. In addition to the animals, we have a large garden from which we preserve as much food as we can for the off-season.

At this time, our farm offers non-GMO fed pastured pork, 100% grass-fed lamb, and pastured eggs. We also have lambs, chickens, and rabbits available from time to time. You can check out our website (link in bio) for more information about what we have available currently. 

We're so glad you're here with us! Feel free to tell us a little about yourself or ask questions in the comments.

Thank you for tagging us, Visit Powhatan, VA!
01/29/2024

Thank you for tagging us, Visit Powhatan, VA!

*Farm Update*A little over a week ago, we said goodbye to our Mangalitsa boar, Doc. He has gone to a lovely local family...
11/08/2023

*Farm Update*
A little over a week ago, we said goodbye to our Mangalitsa boar, Doc. He has gone to a lovely local family, and we look forward to seeing the litters he produces for them!
For the first time in quite some time, we are without a boar, and we have no intention of replacing him. And now that her litter is weaned, we're hoping to find a home for Coco as well. After a lot of thought and discussion these past few months, we have decided to suspend our pig breeding program.
There are many reasons for this. Our kids are getting older, and their schedules take us away from the farm more. Clayton has taken on some extra responsibilities off-farm, and both of us have felt the need to streamline the farm and homestead workload to make up for that. And the biggest is that we have decided to focus our efforts on our flock of St. Croix sheep, as they have been a better return on investment for us.
Does that mean we will no longer have pork available? The short answer is no. We plan to purchase feeder piglets a few times a year to raise for pork, so we will have pork shares available. If you're local and interested in pork, you can message us or find information in the "Pastured Pork" section of our website https://www.trottercreekfarm.com/pasturedpork

Long time, no post!While I shared our goings-on regularly in stories, I recently realized that I haven't shared a regula...
11/01/2023

Long time, no post!

While I shared our goings-on regularly in stories, I recently realized that I haven't shared a regular post since lambing ended in May.

So here are a few of the things that have been happening since then:

In May, we welcomed two Hereford pigs, whom we named Hammie and Harriet. They will be 7 months old tomorrow, and they're already huge! So far, we've been really happy with their temperament and growth.

We also hatched out several clutches of eggs in the spring and purchased broiler chicks in July. In September and October, we processed enough chicken to last us the year.

Over the summer, our garden took a lot of our attention between garden maintenance, harvesting, canning, and preserving. Add in spending a few afternoons a week at the pool with friends, and our summer days were full but fun!

In September, Coco had piglets in the middle of Tropical Storm Ophelia. She is currently ready to wean 6 adorable piglets sired by Doc, the Mangalitsa boar.

In October, the last of our KuneKunes went to processing. As always, we're thankful for the opportunity to raise these animals with care and feed people in our community. Thank you to those of you who have supported our farm!

I'll be sharing more farm updates in the next few days, so stay tuned!

The 2023 lambing season at Trotter Creek Farm has officially come to an end! Our last ewe, a first-timer, had a single l...
05/29/2023

The 2023 lambing season at Trotter Creek Farm has officially come to an end!
Our last ewe, a first-timer, had a single lamb overnight.

The totals for this year's lambing are as follows:
7 ewes
14 lambs
2 single lambs
3 sets of twins
2 sets of triplets
7 ram lambs
7 ewe lambs
Of those ewe lambs, several will be looking for new pastures.

St. Croix Sheep have been a worthwhile investment for the farm! Some of their merits are:
Hair sheep (no need to shear)
Hardy and parasite resistant
Good mothers
Multiple lambs are common, even with first-time ewes
Excellent meat quality
Will eat a variety of vegetation
Will stay in fences, and the few times one has gotten out, they stay close and follow us right back in with the flock

We're overdue for another lamb update!May is such a full month for our family. So much is wrapping up (including school,...
05/22/2023

We're overdue for another lamb update!
May is such a full month for our family. So much is wrapping up (including school, soccer, and church activities), we're welcoming new baby animals, and the garden needs a lot of attention. All this has left me behind on the farm updates.
In the last two weeks, we've welcomed 6 more lambs. Shirley had twins (one of each), a first-time ewe had a single ewe lamb, and Lucy had triplet rams.
Lucy surprised us all with our first multicolor lamb - a little ram with brown and black patches. St. Croix are usually white, but it's not uncommon to find multi-colored sheep in the original stock on the island of St. Croix. From what I've researched, a lamb with this coloring can come through every so often due to recessive genetics. We think he's pretty adorable!
We are now at 6 ewes with lambs, for a total of 6 ewe lambs and 7 ram lambs. We still have one more first-time ewe that has yet to lamb, and then we'll be done with lambing for 2023

It's lambing season! 🐑We woke up Thursday to a ram/ewe set of twins. It was Ethel's second lambing, and like last year, ...
05/09/2023

It's lambing season! 🐑
We woke up Thursday to a ram/ewe set of twins. It was Ethel's second lambing, and like last year, she needed some separate bonding time with her babies before she got the hang of mothering.
On Saturday morning, we discovered one of our first-timers had 2 ewe lambs overnight. Her mothering instinct has been excellent, and both lambs are doing very well.
Sunday night, I walked down to check on the lambs and discovered that Laverne had started lambing. I left her alone, and when Clayton and I went back down an hour later to check her progress, she was in the process of birthing her third lamb! Triplets!!
That third lamb was up and nursing within 10 minutes, and Laverne has handled caring for her three - two rams and a ewe - like a champ. We're keeping a close eye on them, but so far, all three are nursing well and appear to be getting enough nourishment.
We still have four ewes yet to lamb. Shirley looks VERY close, and Lucy is even wider than Laverne was. The other two are first-timers, so it's harder to tell how close they are. With a cold front coming in today, it's very likely that the change in atmospheric pressure will bring on more lambs.
If you want to see regular updates on the lambs, and cute videos too, I will be posting regularly to our stories. We hope you'll follow along!

We have extra eggs available this week! Our happy hens are pastured and fed soy-free, non-GMO feed from Sunrise Farms he...
04/16/2023

We have extra eggs available this week!
Our happy hens are pastured and fed soy-free, non-GMO feed from Sunrise Farms here in Virginia. Our customers rave about the quality of our eggs - fresh and delicious, with golden yolks.
At 4/dozen, they are a great deal compared to similar quality eggs at the grocery store, especially if you want to and !
Pick up at our farm in central Powhatan, just 5 minutes from the courthouse village area

It's March already! Here are a few favorite photos from the last few weeks, and a farm update:Our 7 ewes should start la...
03/04/2023

It's March already! Here are a few favorite photos from the last few weeks, and a farm update:
Our 7 ewes should start lambing in May. Lucy already looks huge! She had twins last year, and we're wondering if she may give us triplets this year.
Coco should go into heat this coming week. Doc has grown a lot and showed interest in Coco during her last heat cycle. We're hopeful that he'll figure things out this cycle or next, so we can have late summer piglets.
The chickens are producing enough eggs to support a few new customers. We also filled 2 incubators with eggs this week, and with a hatch date toward the end of the month.
We started seeds indoors this year to get a jump on garden season. In just a few short months, we'll be planting, and before long we'll be harvesting and putting up produce.
The busy season is fast approaching! Winter is a slower season for us, and as anxious as I am for all the new beginnings of Spring, I'm thankful for the rest and slower pace we've enjoyed

Sometimes, the little things are a big deal! Every time I see one of our new stamped egg cartons, I smile.  What "little...
02/17/2023

Sometimes, the little things are a big deal!
Every time I see one of our new stamped egg cartons, I smile.
What "little thing" has made you smile this week?

Local friends, who needs eggs? Our hens are pastured and fed soy-free, non-GMO feed from Sunrise Farms here in Virginia....
02/10/2023

Local friends, who needs eggs?
Our hens are pastured and fed soy-free, non-GMO feed from Sunrise Farms here in Virginia. Our customers rave about the quality of our eggs - fresh and delicious, with golden yolks.
At 4/dozen, they are a steal compared to what they're asking at the grocery store.
Pick up at our farm in central Powhatan, just 5 minutes from the courthouse village area

The animals don't care.They don't care if we're having a bad day, if we're injured, if we'd rather stay out of bad weath...
01/30/2023

The animals don't care.
They don't care if we're having a bad day, if we're injured, if we'd rather stay out of bad weather.
They don't care if we have a cough and fever and body aches.
This is not a criticism of the animals. I'm simply saying that they depend on us for their well-being, no matter what is going on in our lives. They don't understand, and therefore won't give us a pass, if we miss their meal time.
This past week, a virus went through our family. Despite our illness, the whole family worked together to make sure all the animals were fed and watered. We (Clayton especially, who does the most physically demanding chores) pushed through to make sure all the animals' needs were met.

There are no sick days on a small family farm.
But is it worth it? For us, it is.

Post  #2 regarding changes at Trotter Creek Farm. On Saturday, our breeding flock of turkeys went to their new home.  Th...
01/16/2023

Post #2 regarding changes at Trotter Creek Farm.
On Saturday, our breeding flock of turkeys went to their new home.
This was a bit of a sad one, but after evaluating our first year in business, it was clear that the turkeys were not the best use of our resources. I've loved having them. This particular flock has been easy to keep and hardy, plus hatching poults was one of my highlights of the spring. But they weren't earning their keep the way we had hoped, and we had to be realistic about what was best in the long run.
Maybe one day we'll have turkeys again, but for now, we appreciate less chores and more time to spend in other ways.

This is Doc, our new Mangalitsa boar.Last week, I mentioned that I would be sharing about some of the successes, learnin...
01/10/2023

This is Doc, our new Mangalitsa boar.

Last week, I mentioned that I would be sharing about some of the successes, learning experiences, and changes coming to the farm. Doc represents one of those changes. 
After much discussion, 2023 will be the last year that we have KuneKune pigs at Trotter Creek Farm. This was a hard decision, as we invested a lot of time and resources into the breed, but when we looked at the big picture and goals for our farm, we realized that this was for the best. 
There are a few main reasons for our decision, and in the interest of being brief, I'll condense them to some bullet points:
* The overwhelming feedback from our pork customers is that they would like larger cuts of meat. KuneKune pork will not yield the larger cuts they would like. 
* The longer grow-out time for KuneKune pork requires more space, and multiple herds of different sizes/ages. A faster-growing pig will allow us to more efficiently scale up our pork production. 
* The market for KuneKune pigs has changed in our area. We had a very difficult time finding homes for piglets and adult breeding stock during the second half of 2022, even after reducing the asking price, and it has become clear that we weren't the only ones in that position. 
* The time and expenses involved in evaluating and registering breeding stock could be better used elsewhere in our farm operation. This is especially true with the decreased value of registered KuneKunes in the current market, which reduces our return on investment. 

Our new plan for pigs moving forward is to have larger heritage breed crosses, and Doc will sire those litters. To start, we will breed him with one of our remaining Red Wattle/American Guinea Hog crosses, and in the Spring we plan to add some Large Black Hog gilts to have future litters. We will raise some of those piglets out for pork, and the rest will go to other farms and homesteads. Friends of ours have raised this cross more than once and have been very happy with the growth rates, grow-out time, size of cuts, and overall pork quality.  Our new breeds have a long history of hardy European lines, and traditionally produce rich and flavorful pork.

Happy November,  friends! How it's November already, I'm not quite sure, but when you're ready to part with your fall de...
11/02/2022

Happy November, friends!
How it's November already, I'm not quite sure, but when you're ready to part with your fall decor, please keep us in mind!

We accept:
🎃 pumpkins and squash (unbleached, unpainted, and without mold)
🌰 acorns
🌾 straw bales/hay bales
🥕 extra produce that's going soft but not slimy/moldy (we do not accept potatoes)
❔️if you have something you think our animals would enjoy, but you're not sure if we accept it, please feel free to reach out.

We were fortunate to receive several donations from families who found us through last year and our animals enjoyed all the treats everyone was kind enough to share!

Thank you to our community for all your support!

Who needs eggs? 🥚Local friends, we have a few extra dozen eggs available this week. Our happy hens are pastured and fed ...
10/10/2022

Who needs eggs? 🥚
Local friends, we have a few extra dozen eggs available this week. Our happy hens are pastured and fed high-quality non-GMO feed. Please send us a direct message for more information if you're interested.

It's starting to feel like fall. 🍂Our mornings have been cool and misty,  even though the afternoons are still hot and s...
09/17/2022

It's starting to feel like fall. 🍂Our mornings have been cool and misty, even though the afternoons are still hot and sunny.
The garden is slowing down now, both due to the end of summer and hungry garden pests. I can't complain though - with school and fall activites starting, I don't have as much time to devote to preserving the harvest.
Our transition to a "fall schedule" was not seamless, but I think at this point we're settling into a rhythm. We just wrapped up our 4th week of our new homeschool year, and soccer and church programs are in full swing. I feel a lot more confident about how things are going now, and hopefully I can get into a more regular schedule on social media.
Over the summer, I really struggled under the anxiety of how I was going to do it all - balancing the homeschooling, homemaking, garden preservation, church responsibilities, small business (I do a lot of the online and admin work), and social media. Thankfully, as the school year approached, I was able to brainstorm some ways to manage my responsibilities better. It has involved lowering my standards in some areas, getting help in others, and being more intentional with my time. I can guarantee things will never be perfect, but I'm excited to see where this fall will take us.

"I could never raise my own meat - I'd get too attached." This is something I hear a lot, and I absolutely get it! I've ...
08/21/2022

"I could never raise my own meat - I'd get too attached." 

This is something I hear a lot, and I absolutely get it! I've always been an animal lover. I actually wanted to be a veterinarian at one point in elementary school, until I learned that vets don't just take care of cute animals, but also have to euthanize them.

So you can imagine Clayton's surprise when I turned to him one day in 2014 and said, "I think we should raise broiler chickens." We had been keeping egg layers for about a year at that point and I had been doing more research about eating a less-processed, "real food" diet. After doing some reading, I became convinced that I would feel much more comfortable knowing exactly how our food was being raised and fed. Our first meat-growing experience was not without its difficulties, but obviously the benefits outweighed the negatives. We have raised hundreds of broilers since then, both for ourselves and for a few friends. Once we moved to the farm, it was only a matter of time before we added in pork, turkey, and lamb. And I'm still an animal lover - we take our responsibility to raise our food very seriously, and are so thankful for the opportunity to provide food for others as well. 

The truth is, no matter where or how you get your meat, an animal had to die. 

With modern grocery stores, we are often so far removed from how our food gets to us. Raising animals, and facing the reality of their life and death, gives us a greater appreciation for the food that we put on our table.

Last month we harvested our potato crop and it far exceeded our expectations! After letting them cure for a couple weeks...
08/11/2022

Last month we harvested our potato crop and it far exceeded our expectations! After letting them cure for a couple weeks, I began the task of storing it all.
First I picked the best firm and unblemished potatoes for long-term storage in cardboard boxes with holes punched in the side. I forgot to take pictures, but I tried a new method this year with shredded paper, which hopefully will help deter sprouting and spoilage.
We still had several pounds left, so we blanched and froze 2 gallon bags, and then decided to try something new and pressure can the rest. So far we've canned 14 quarts and I think we have enough to fill the canner at least once more.
We're so thankful for each successful harvest! It's a lot of work up-front, but I know we'll appreciate this food for the months to come.

Oh hey, we're back! 👋I ended up taking an unintentional month off from posting to social media, so this seemed like a go...
08/05/2022

Oh hey, we're back! 👋
I ended up taking an unintentional month off from posting to social media, so this seemed like a good time for an introduction for new followers.

I'm Kim, the face behind social media at Trotter Creek Farm. My husband, Clayton, and I own and operate Trotter Creek Farm, LLC. We're college sweethearts living out Clayton's lifelong dream of farming (and my dream to have lots of animals).

I run most of the admin side of the farm, homeschool our two kids, and try to keep up with the daily running of a home and homestead. Clayton works a full-time job and farms on the side, and we both are very active in our church and its ministries. It's a full life, but we love it!

We raise heritage KuneKune pigs, St. Croix sheep, Narragansett turkeys, rabbits, and a variety of chickens. We also employ three ridiculously cute pest control specialist cats and two diligent farm dog protectors. In addition to the animals, we have a large garden from which we preserve as much food as we can for the off-season.

At this time our farm offers non-GMO fed pastured pork, pastured eggs, and breeding quality registered KuneKune piglets. As we build our flock, we hope to also add grass-fed lamb to our offerings. You can check out our website (www.trottercreekfarm.com) for more information about what we have available currently.

We're so glad you're here with us! Feel free to tell us a little about yourself or ask questions in the comments.

Just over a week ago, we moved Ronnie the ram and all 5 ram lambs into the "bachelor paddock" away from the ewes and ewe...
07/06/2022

Just over a week ago, we moved Ronnie the ram and all 5 ram lambs into the "bachelor paddock" away from the ewes and ewe lambs. And with that transition, our baby season is officially over. All piglets, lambs, and bunnies have been weaned, and the chicks and turkey poults we hatched are growing out well.

Now that all the babies are growing up, our focus turns to harvesting the garden. The abundant fresh produce is such a treat this time of year! It also keeps its busy as we put up as much as we can for winter by canning, freezing, fermenting, dehydrating, and putting long-term foods, like onions and garlic, into storage.
We are so thankful for the opportunity to grow our own food, even with all the extra work it brings.

The pick of Ginger's most recent litter is back on the market through no fault of her own.This gilt is wonderful! She wa...
06/16/2022

The pick of Ginger's most recent litter is back on the market through no fault of her own.
This gilt is wonderful! She was born the largest of the litter and has maintained a solid growth rate. She also has a friendly and gentle temperament, always ready to flop over for a belly rub. Recently weaned and ready for her new pasture! 

Awakino/Te Whangi
DOB: 4/7/2022
AKKPS #25296
Ginger/Black, unwattled, 10 even teats

Send us a message for details or check out www.trottercreekfarm.com/availablepiglets (link in profile) for more information on this gilt, plus a boarling and proven boar who are also available.

Just starting out with KuneKune pigs and looking for a registered boarling? Or maybe you're further along in your breedi...
06/07/2022

Just starting out with KuneKune pigs and looking for a registered boarling?
Or maybe you're further along in your breeding program and seeking a proven boar?
Either way we've got you covered!
Handsome ginger/black, unwattled Te Whangi boarling freshly weaned and ready for new pastures
AKKPS #25295
DOB 4/7/22

Also available is his sire, a proven black/white, double-wattled Te Whangi boar. Snoopy has good conformation and a great temperament - we have just decided to go in a different direction in our breeding program.
AKKPS #15334
DOB 12/30/20

www.trottercreekfarm.com/availablepiglets

Feed and hay prices keep going up and we're already thinking about how we're going to feed our animals over winter. Than...
06/06/2022

Feed and hay prices keep going up and we're already thinking about how we're going to feed our animals over winter.
Thankfully we have a source for unsprayed hay, but wanted to experiment with harvesting some of our own. Over the Memorial Day weekend, Clayton scythed several rows in our back pasture. He followed some tutorials to make a haystack l once it was dry mid-week, but one heavy rain made it clear that our technique could use some work. So we turned to Plan B.
These bales may not be pretty, but they were fairly easy to put together using materials we already had - the sturdy box from our chicken plucker and some baling twine. Since we're short on storage space, we're going to try storing it on pallets to keep it off the ground, and covered by a tarp to keep the rain off. Time will tell if this is a viable solution.
We've tried many experiments in our years of homesteading. Some have been successes and many have been big fat failures, but you don't know if something will work if you don't try.

A few glimpses of our life from the last week or soPoppy's babies are growing well. Is that not the sweetest little face...
05/27/2022

A few glimpses of our life from the last week or so

Poppy's babies are growing well. Is that not the sweetest little face? 😍 We had a little scare when one of the little bunnies accidentally jumped out of the hutch yesterday morning. It took all 4 of us to catch it, but we eventually got it back in with mama.

Yesterday was also our last day of homeschool co-op. They had a celebration with a bounce house, cotton candy, face painting, and yard games. It was a fun way to end the school year.

Soccer season ended last weekend with a tournament in 90+ degree weather. Both kids played well and our oldest kiddo's team won the championship game! Clayton had the opportunity to coach both teams and it's been fun to watch them all improve over the course of the season.

The busy spring "baby season" is almost over. Last weekend we said goodbye to the last of Nutmeg's piglets who were going to new homes. In about a week, Ginger's piglets will be ready to wean too. We have one registered boarling from that litter who has not yet been claimed (www.trottercreekfarm.com/availablepiglets), and that will be it for piglets until fall.

This time of year as we transition from spring to summer, I'm feeling like I've lost my bearings a bit. As our school year ends and our responsibilities shift more to the outside, I'm having a hard time finding a new rhythm and routine. I'll try to get onto a more regular schedule for sharing what's happening here on the farm. In the meantime, thank you for bearing with me and following along!

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Powhatan, VA

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