Blue Mojo Farm

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Blue Mojo Farm Private family farmstead. Please visit our website or email us! No calls please.

Operating as usual

Beautiful art by Mary T.
08/02/2021

Beautiful art by Mary T.

To our loyal customers hoping to find ostrich products, we are shutting down our ostrich business and selling our flock....
29/01/2021
Burdette Ostrich Farm

To our loyal customers hoping to find ostrich products, we are shutting down our ostrich business and selling our flock. We hope in a few years to be "back in it".

That being said, our highest recommendation goes to the Burdette Ostrich Farm in Iowa (link below). The quality is excellent and the pricing is more than fair, plus they only charge actual shipping costs.

Enjoy, and hope to "see" you all for spring and/or Thanksgiving turkeys.

Princess Zemi isn't sure how she feels about BMF's FIRST EGG LAID Day of 2021!
15/01/2021

Princess Zemi isn't sure how she feels about BMF's FIRST EGG LAID Day of 2021!

Beautiful ostrich wreath designed by our friend and neighbor April!
02/01/2021

Beautiful ostrich wreath designed by our friend and neighbor April!

12/12/2020

As the weather turns colder, please remember not to use fuel-powered heaters in ENCLOSED spaces with your birds.

--

Any fuel-fired heaters, such as kerosene heaters, or propane heaters (Mr. Heater and the like), SHOULD NOT BE USED in an enclosed space with birds.

Carbon monoxide is the "silent killer." It is an odorless, tasteless gas given off by fuel-fired appliances. It kills by displacing oxygen in the lungs. Since birds breathe so many times faster than we do -- up to 45 times a minute, and the fact that their lungs allow them to take in oxygen, or lack of oxygen, on both inhale and exhale, it is vitally important that they not be exposed to carbon monoxide.

Another beautiful creation... we are so impressed by what our customers can do with ostrich egg shells!  Hopefully the n...
04/12/2020

Another beautiful creation... we are so impressed by what our customers can do with ostrich egg shells! Hopefully the next laying season will yield more art-worthy shells.

Blue Slates inspired the name of our farm.  Simply beautiful!
01/12/2020

Blue Slates inspired the name of our farm. Simply beautiful!

The Slate or Blue Slate turkey variety, named for its color, is solid to ashy blue over the entire body, with or without a few black flecks. It is also called the Blue or Lavender turkey. Renewed interest in its biological fitness, survivability, and superior flavor has captured consumer interest and created a growing market niche.

Hens are lighter in hue than toms. The head, throat, and wattles are red to bluish white. The beak is horn in color; the eyes are brown; and the beard is black. The shanks and toes are pink.

The Slate turkey gene is a legitimate mutation, rather than the result of a cross of the Black turkey on a white turkey as stated in early texts. An added element of confusion in defining the variety is that there are actually two different genetic mutations (one dominant and one recessive) that produce the blue slate color, and these produce slightly different shades. White and rusty brown markings may be present but are considered a defect.

The Slate is less well documented and more variable in type and color than any other variety. This makes it challenging to breed consistently.

The Standard weight for a young tom is 23 pounds and 14 pounds for a young hen. Since, however, the Slate has not been selected for production attributes, including weight gain, for years, many birds may be smaller than the standard. Careful selection for good health, ability to mate naturally, and production attributes will return this variety to its former stature.

The Slate was accepted by the American Poultry Association in 1874. It has been popular in exhibition circles and is gaining popularity in pastured poultry production.

Your support of The Livestock Conservancy helps this breed and many others.

http://bit.ly/SlateTurkey

26/11/2020
This is the most creative use of a BMF ostrich feather to date!  Beautiful vase from Muddy Horse Pottery.
25/11/2020

This is the most creative use of a BMF ostrich feather to date! Beautiful vase from Muddy Horse Pottery.

Ostrich feather raku vase (sold)

Absolutely "important"!
20/11/2020
Why is Heritage Turkey Considered the Best? (Plus recipe and menu ideas)

Absolutely "important"!

What exactly is a heritage turkey? It's a naturally mating bird with a slow growth rate (taking 26-30 weeks to mature) that spends most of its long life outdoors. In a Bon Appetit taste test, the Heritage turkey won, 4 out of 5 tasters preferring the Heritage. Learn more about why these turkeys are....

For those who haven't heard about our newest "blue" addition, meet Zemi (blue smoke tortoiseshell Maine Coon).
17/11/2020

For those who haven't heard about our newest "blue" addition, meet Zemi (blue smoke tortoiseshell Maine Coon).

We'll be listening!  Today at 2pm Eastern (soon).
17/11/2020

We'll be listening! Today at 2pm Eastern (soon).

Tomorrow we have the rare treat of chatting with the folks who led the charge for the Conservancy’s early efforts to conserve Heritage turkeys in America.

The call to action emerged with a 1997 census, revealing only 1400 breeding birds of all the varieties left in the US. Immense effort turned the tide and much of the story has been forgotten over the 20+ years since the project’s start.

Let’s discuss the turkey’s great comeback from crisis that could have so easily brought extinction to many of the traditional varieties we know today.

Our guests:

Carolyn J. Christman served as Program Coordinator for The Livestock Conservancy from 1987-1999. A historian, anthropologist, and former high school teacher, she was educated at the University of North Carolina and Wake Forest University. She has authored several publications on rare breeds conservation, including A Rare Breed Album and Birds of a Feather – Saving Rare Turkeys from Extinction.

Bob Hawes - When Bob was 10, his father, one of America’s first used car salesmen, took some ducks in trade for a car. Thus began his lifelong love of poultry. He has had a long and distinguished career that has included McGill University (1962 – 1971), Hy-Line International (1971 – 1978), and most recently as professor and poultry scientist at the University of Maine, retiring in 1997. He has authored scientific publications, book chapters, and popular articles on poultry production and aquaculture.

Bob served on our Board of Directors from 1994 – 1997. He co-authored “Birds of a Feather: Saving Rare Turkeys from Extinction” with former staff member Carolyn Christman.

Marjie Bender, M.Ed. in Agricultural Science from the University of California-Davis, has been in sustainable agriculture since 1991, with over 20 years of experience in the nonprofit sector. She coordinated the first Livestock Conservancy poultry census and led our efforts to recover heritage turkeys and Colonial Spanish horses in America.

05/11/2020

Did you know that turkey is the number five farm commodity in Virginia, netting $258,466,000 in cash receipts? 🦃

Yes it is!
01/11/2020

Yes it is!

Nice!
30/10/2020

Nice!

*Grant Alert*
FACT’s 2020 Fund-a-Farmer Grants

Food Animal Concerns Trust (FACT) awards competitive grants of up to $2,500 to working, independent family farmers located in the U.S. who raise beef cattle, bison, broiler chickens, dairy cows, goats, laying hens, pigs, sheep and/or turkeys.

Before submitting your online application, please read the complete set of eligibility guidelines listed at the link.

Applications must be submitted online by 11:59pm CT on December 1, 2020 to be considered for this round of funding. Grants will be awarded in February 2021.

https://foodanimalconcernstrust.org/grants

30/10/2020

We've had a LOT of interest in heritage Thanksgiving turkeys this year; although we cannot fulfill these requests (all of ours are spoken for already), we are looking at expanding next year and offering heritage Thanksgiving turkeys to existing customers.

We also may make a few heritage turkeys from our (halfway to Thanksgiving) Memorial Day processing available, because turkey is good all year long! If this is something you might be interested in, please comment below.

Stay safe everyone. Have a lovely weekend and be kind.

Awesome.
23/10/2020

Awesome.

We’re a day late, but for #NationalPetsForVeteransDay we’d like to celebrate the two awardees of our Operation Farm Dog. This program is in partnership with Red Hive Goldens.

Greg Babcock. A 36-year Army veteran from Michigan. Greg now raises livestock as part of his family farm. Last fall he was awarded Freedom’s Belle who has been a most loyal companion and support in relief of the anxiety Greg has dealt with post-service.

Jimmy Martin. Who entered the Air Force on September 11, 2001 and still serves in the Air Force Reserve. Jimmy is a Quality Assurance Specialist for the Department of Defense. This spring, Lady Liberty joined the Martin family to assist with their Bluegrass Belties Farm & Orchard.

We will be announcing plans for expansion of our Operation Farm Dog program at our conference next month. Tune in!

To read more:
https://michigan.farmvetco.org/2020/05/05/lady-liberty-rose/

#homegrownbyheroes #operationfarmdog

We really appreciate VCE POC Jim Hilleary's work on this video.  Please enjoy...  PS.  A couple of the facts are a littl...
20/10/2020
Please Pass the Ostrich

We really appreciate VCE POC Jim Hilleary's work on this video. Please enjoy...

PS. A couple of the facts are a little bit off but Eddie's commentary was done completely on the fly with no cue cards (or wife waving hands in the background)!

A two-part program that spotlights ostrich production as an agricultural operation then follows through with a recipe and how-to instructions for preparing o...

Fun idea!
19/10/2020

Fun idea!

*Fun, Free Webinar* from Food Animal Concerns Trust (FACT)

Tips for Offering Virtual Farm Experience

Tuesday, October 20, 2020
3:30 PM - 4:30 PM (Eastern Time)

With social distancing in place and in-person interactions limited, some farmers are thinking outside of the box. Come hear from our awesome panelists about the "virtual experiences" they are offering on their operations. The experiences range from alpaca zoom meetings for adults, to virtual tours and field trips for children. Our panelists will discuss the fun, innovative - and profitable - ways they are sharing their farm with others via screens and video cams.

Panelists: Scottie Jones from Leaping Lamb Farm in Oregon and Lee Rankin from Apple Hill Farm in North Carolina

Register for this or other webinars: https://foodanimalconcernstrust.org/webinars

Beautiful work from Mary T.
17/10/2020

Beautiful work from Mary T.

Hoping to have some of our own someday.
08/10/2020

Hoping to have some of our own someday.

The San Clemente Island goat is very gentle with excellent mothering abilities. Though relatively small, it’s not quite dwarf breed size.

This breed is uncommonly fine boned, and typically red or tan with characteristic black markings. It once exhibited a range of colors and color markings, sometimes seen today. Both sexes are horned and although their large horns resemble those of Spanish goats, San Clemente Island goats are not of Spanish origin.

San Clemente Island, off the coast of Southern California, is owned by the U.S. government, used by the U.S. Navy. In 1875, goats were introduced from a population imported from Santa Catalina Island. In 1934, when the Navy became responsible for the island, hunting and trapping of the goats was allowed until 1972. At this time a survey found that the 15,000 goats on the island were a nuisance to native plants and wildlife. So, a systematic removal program began to reduce the population. By 1980 an estimated 4,000 goats were left.

At that time, the Navy proposed a shooting from helicopters program. This was blocked in court by the animal welfare group Fund for Animals. Under the court decision, goat trappers removed about 3,000 goats to return to domestication. Most were adopted out by Fund for Animals with agreements that the goats would not be bred by the new owners. Other San Clemente Island goats went directly from the barges that brought them off the island to individuals and farms.

The breed is still critically endangered, but has proven adaptable in a variety of climates.

With the University of Cordoba in Spain, The Livestock Conservancy, conducted a DNA study of the breed in 2007, finding that the San Clemente Island goat is a genetically distinct breed, unrelated to the numerous others in the study. The findings raise many questions about the origin of the goat and further study is needed.

Your support of The Livestock Conservancy helps this breed and many others.
http://bit.ly/SCIslandGoat

Meet DJ (named for Jill's nephew who arrived the same day s/he hatched)!  Our last chick of the year, s/he's the only on...
04/10/2020

Meet DJ (named for Jill's nephew who arrived the same day s/he hatched)! Our last chick of the year, s/he's the only one that hatched from our last set of eggs. The next closest in age are 5 weeks old so this will be interesting.

For those of you who remember Jericho, our ambassador turkey (and Eddie's favorite), here's a fantastic photo of him liv...
03/10/2020

For those of you who remember Jericho, our ambassador turkey (and Eddie's favorite), here's a fantastic photo of him living his best life at Little Tree Huggers.

This chick is making quite the impact on students (hatched from Blue Mojo Farm eggs as part of an agriculture program). ...
30/09/2020

This chick is making quite the impact on students (hatched from Blue Mojo Farm eggs as part of an agriculture program). Too cute!

It was a lot of work but worth it...  Eddie's tomatoes turned into amazing sauce!
22/09/2020

It was a lot of work but worth it... Eddie's tomatoes turned into amazing sauce!

What a great idea!
16/09/2020

What a great idea!

We need your help! VDOF is asking for the acorns/nuts of tree species across Virginia. The seeds will be planted at the Augusta Forestry Center, and the hardwood seedlings will be sold to Virginia landowners next year. Here are easy guidelines for nut collection. Help grow the forests of tomorrow.

#futuretrees #acorns #forestlandowners

More info on nut collection: https://dof.virginia.gov/tree/acorn-collect.htm

Find your local VDOF office: https://dof.virginia.gov/locations/index.htm

One of our customers has produced some beautiful art out of ostrich egg shells.
14/09/2020

One of our customers has produced some beautiful art out of ostrich egg shells.

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General information

Due to biosecurity concerns, we do not offer tours or visiting hours to the general public. Please contact us directly for more information and/or if you would like to arrange a time to visit.

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For more information, please go to our website (www.bluemojofarm.com)!

Comments

"Thousands of feathers working together to ensure quality paint process for GM vehicles."
Happiness.
A lovely couple from Little Tree Huggers "pardoned" two turkeys tonight! Happy days for the turkeys going to their "forever home" and heartwarming to see educators saving these gorgeous, loving heritage breed birds. They will be well loved by their students!
Usually you don't need binoculars for turkeys, ducks and ostriches, but it's still calming to watch them!
Hahahahah!
New quadruplets!
There is a VERY precocious chocolate Muscovy duck trying to give the poult sitting in the towel moral support... by sitting in there with him. :-)