Red Gate Farm

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Red Gate Farm Located in southern IL, we are a horse-powered, sustainable farm, promoting stewardship and educational opportunities, while raising our family and improving our surrounding environment.

We also train horses and offer TIP-gentled mustangs for adoption. We are a horse-powered, sustainable permaculture farm, striving to raise our children, grow our business, and become more God-sufficient (as opposed to self-sufficient, all while improving the soils and surrounding natural blessings we have been given.

Operating as usual

01/01/2022

Happy New Year!

We have our first really cold (low teens) winter weather arriving tonight, so we were in high gear the last few days trying to get our barn siding up to help insulate our camper. We almost got it finished, except for a few boards and the doors, before the rain hit last night. Nonetheless, having the camper inside and sheltered from winter winds has been a major goal, and we mostly made it! Here’s a time lapse of some of yesterday’s work. We had an assembly line going, with Sean milling the logs and planing the boards, me cutting the ends and painting ends, and JR and Mikayla installing them. The other kids assisted where needed. I think it’s going to be a nice barn once the RV moves out and we finish the inside!

Merry Christmas from our family to yours!  Mikayla opened her gifts and is all ready to train some mustangs, with her ne...
25/12/2021

Merry Christmas from our family to yours! Mikayla opened her gifts and is all ready to train some mustangs, with her new helmet and safety vest! We hope you all are having just as much celebrating.

Merry Christmas from our family to yours! Mikayla opened her gifts and is all ready to train some mustangs, with her new helmet and safety vest! We hope you all are having just as much celebrating.

I know Christmas traditionally makes us think of hams, turkey, or even goose, but farming doesn’t stop for the holidays!...
22/12/2021

I know Christmas traditionally makes us think of hams, turkey, or even goose, but farming doesn’t stop for the holidays! Time to think ahead! Once again, our Amish friend and our personal beef supplier, who specializes in grass-fed, grass-finished beef has 1 and a half beef available. No vaccines, antibiotics, or chemicals. He is offering in quarter, half, or whole beef, and $3.50/lb hanging weight plus processing fee (paid separately). While he is not offering individual cuts at this time, if you are interested in a smaller quantity, I am willing to split a quarter.

For a quarter, half, or whole, contact Larry Chupp at 217-856-6455. To arrange to split a quarter, pm me! Every time I offer these, they go fast, so don’t delay if you want in on this deal for top quality, grass finished beef. Must be picked up in Arthur, IL.

(Photo is our former steers, just for attention)

I know Christmas traditionally makes us think of hams, turkey, or even goose, but farming doesn’t stop for the holidays! Time to think ahead! Once again, our Amish friend and our personal beef supplier, who specializes in grass-fed, grass-finished beef has 1 and a half beef available. No vaccines, antibiotics, or chemicals. He is offering in quarter, half, or whole beef, and $3.50/lb hanging weight plus processing fee (paid separately). While he is not offering individual cuts at this time, if you are interested in a smaller quantity, I am willing to split a quarter.

For a quarter, half, or whole, contact Larry Chupp at 217-856-6455. To arrange to split a quarter, pm me! Every time I offer these, they go fast, so don’t delay if you want in on this deal for top quality, grass finished beef. Must be picked up in Arthur, IL.

(Photo is our former steers, just for attention)

Now that most of the fine, time consuming, skeletal work is done, the barn is making big progress!  Weather permitting, ...
20/12/2021

Now that most of the fine, time consuming, skeletal work is done, the barn is making big progress! Weather permitting, we could have the camper moved in by next week and then work on the final details like doors and windows. This has been such a satisfying project, and certainly the largest we’ve ever built!

Now that most of the fine, time consuming, skeletal work is done, the barn is making big progress! Weather permitting, we could have the camper moved in by next week and then work on the final details like doors and windows. This has been such a satisfying project, and certainly the largest we’ve ever built!

In spite of the many delays, we are slowly, but surely, making progress on the new barn.  We even take advantage of good...
16/12/2021

In spite of the many delays, we are slowly, but surely, making progress on the new barn. We even take advantage of good weather by working by lantern light!

Good morning, everyone!  December has officially arrived, and since Christmas is right around the corner, we decided to ...
01/12/2021
Out With the Old and In With the New + EXCITING ANNOUNCEMENT!

Good morning, everyone! December has officially arrived, and since Christmas is right around the corner, we decided to publish an extra video this week. It offers a general update of happenings around here, but most importantly, we announce something REALLY exciting!!

Out With the Old and In With the New + EXCITING ANNOUNCEMENT! https://youtu.be/ZejS-QcNgdQ

This week, we have an exciting announcement to make. It's also time for an update on developments with the new farm!Join our fans by picking up some Red G*t...

We are thrilled to be approaching our current goal of 10,000 subscribers on our YouTube channel!  If you haven’t already...
30/11/2021
Moving Big Logs Without Big Equipment

We are thrilled to be approaching our current goal of 10,000 subscribers on our YouTube channel! If you haven’t already, please consider helping us reach our goal! Your support helps us continue educating others now and in the future, under our new model: Learn. Teach. Thrive.

Moving Big Logs Without Big Equipment
https://youtu.be/RLMovKoez5A

This week, Sean shows how he handles and maneuvers large logs without big, expensive logging equipment.

25/11/2021

Happy Thanksgiving! The Red G*te Farm family wishes you a wonderful day, full of blessing!

Disclaimer: Here at Red G*te Farm, we enjoy animals—wild or domestic, do our best to care for them properly, allow them ...
21/11/2021

Disclaimer: Here at Red G*te Farm, we enjoy animals—wild or domestic, do our best to care for them properly, allow them to be natural, and, for those designated as meat, we are grateful for their sacrifice. We have tried to instill these values in our children.

For the last year, our youngest son, Nate, has been developing an interest in learning to hunt for meat. He talks often of “providing for his family” and spent countless hours studying, watching videos, and learning all he could about proper hunting technique, how to help ensure animals don’t suffer, how to select appropriate animals to hunt, and so forth. He hunted with mentors, took a hunter safety course, and even worked around the farm to earn and save all his money to buy a nice crossbow.

This season, our family has been finishing off the frozen meat in our freezer. He was determined to fill that freezer! He spent many hours dedicated to exploring our new property, learning the deer trails and nesting areas, learning to track, and so on. He got his license and permits. He even learned how to use a deer call, but also how to make the noise himself to make a deer stop moving, in the event he wasn’t able to move to use the call. He often woke and went off into the woods between 4-5 a.m., so he could hunt before school, returning only to get ready and go to school. As soon as he got home, he was back off in the woods. He actually saw many deer, but he always had an excuse…”they weren’t at the right angle for a clean shot” or “it was too young” or “it was a little far away”, which I know some other less patient boys (and men) wouldn’t have given half the respect and consideration to.

This weekend, all his hard work and patience paid off. He headed off into the woods again yesterday, and within about 2 hours, we got the call that he had dropped his first deer! Not just a deer, but a nice, mature buck—exactly the type he had been waiting on!

As if we weren’t proud enough, just as we had taught him, he wanted to ensure he could use not only the meat, but as much of the deer as possible. Due to our living situation at the moment, we used a processor, but Nate decided to spend more of his hard-earned money to have the head mounted as a memory and the hide tanned, just so it didn’t go to waste. (We’ve decided to help him out a bit as part of his Christmas present!)

We are so proud of the values our son has learned. Killing is never something we enjoy or want to do just for sport, but when approached from a proper perspective, with respect and consideration for the animal, minimizing waste whenever possible, and using the meat for our own family, we see it as part of the circle of life. I’m so thrilled that Nathan has taken those ideals to heart.

Great job, little Buddy!

Disclaimer: Here at Red G*te Farm, we enjoy animals—wild or domestic, do our best to care for them properly, allow them to be natural, and, for those designated as meat, we are grateful for their sacrifice. We have tried to instill these values in our children.

For the last year, our youngest son, Nate, has been developing an interest in learning to hunt for meat. He talks often of “providing for his family” and spent countless hours studying, watching videos, and learning all he could about proper hunting technique, how to help ensure animals don’t suffer, how to select appropriate animals to hunt, and so forth. He hunted with mentors, took a hunter safety course, and even worked around the farm to earn and save all his money to buy a nice crossbow.

This season, our family has been finishing off the frozen meat in our freezer. He was determined to fill that freezer! He spent many hours dedicated to exploring our new property, learning the deer trails and nesting areas, learning to track, and so on. He got his license and permits. He even learned how to use a deer call, but also how to make the noise himself to make a deer stop moving, in the event he wasn’t able to move to use the call. He often woke and went off into the woods between 4-5 a.m., so he could hunt before school, returning only to get ready and go to school. As soon as he got home, he was back off in the woods. He actually saw many deer, but he always had an excuse…”they weren’t at the right angle for a clean shot” or “it was too young” or “it was a little far away”, which I know some other less patient boys (and men) wouldn’t have given half the respect and consideration to.

This weekend, all his hard work and patience paid off. He headed off into the woods again yesterday, and within about 2 hours, we got the call that he had dropped his first deer! Not just a deer, but a nice, mature buck—exactly the type he had been waiting on!

As if we weren’t proud enough, just as we had taught him, he wanted to ensure he could use not only the meat, but as much of the deer as possible. Due to our living situation at the moment, we used a processor, but Nate decided to spend more of his hard-earned money to have the head mounted as a memory and the hide tanned, just so it didn’t go to waste. (We’ve decided to help him out a bit as part of his Christmas present!)

We are so proud of the values our son has learned. Killing is never something we enjoy or want to do just for sport, but when approached from a proper perspective, with respect and consideration for the animal, minimizing waste whenever possible, and using the meat for our own family, we see it as part of the circle of life. I’m so thrilled that Nathan has taken those ideals to heart.

Great job, little Buddy!

Anyone Who knows our little dog, Rosa, knows she is full of personality and surprises. I’ve always had a rule that a dog...
20/11/2021

Anyone Who knows our little dog, Rosa, knows she is full of personality and surprises. I’ve always had a rule that a dog cannot ride in my lap in the car. They have to stay on the opposite side of my armrest. Rosa has learned how to take it right to the line, and she will spend long stretches of time riding in this position.. (Oh, and for the record, I am parked for this photo!)

Anyone Who knows our little dog, Rosa, knows she is full of personality and surprises. I’ve always had a rule that a dog cannot ride in my lap in the car. They have to stay on the opposite side of my armrest. Rosa has learned how to take it right to the line, and she will spend long stretches of time riding in this position.. (Oh, and for the record, I am parked for this photo!)

Well I’m about 4 days behind in posting this (a good reason you should SUBSCRIBE! to our channel—so you don’t have to wa...
18/11/2021
Building Stall Alley Part 2

Well I’m about 4 days behind in posting this (a good reason you should SUBSCRIBE! to our channel—so you don’t have to wait for me to post the link! It will notify you automatically!) Anyway, here’s the latest update on our construction, and how we are designing our Stall Alley!

https://youtu.be/tUbVL80Rc9c

Part 2 of this stall construction series shows how we design and build heavy duty kick walls and build with green, fresh-milled lumber.

Hard to get much done with these two cuties around!
17/11/2021

Hard to get much done with these two cuties around!

Hard to get much done with these two cuties around!

One of the things that attracted me to our new farm property is the lane leading to our driveway.  It's a couple of mile...
11/11/2021

One of the things that attracted me to our new farm property is the lane leading to our driveway. It's a couple of miles long, and this is the view. I thought it was gorgeous through the summer, but now that the fall colors have arrived, WOW!! (and don't worry, I was parked to take this photo!)

One of the things that attracted me to our new farm property is the lane leading to our driveway. It's a couple of miles long, and this is the view. I thought it was gorgeous through the summer, but now that the fall colors have arrived, WOW!! (and don't worry, I was parked to take this photo!)

It’s been a busy week, and we are enjoying a Sunday off! We’ve got the first stall almost complete, and we’re now splitt...
07/11/2021

It’s been a busy week, and we are enjoying a Sunday off! We’ve got the first stall almost complete, and we’re now splitting our time between finishing up the first section of stalls and beginning our barn build.

The weather has been extremely uncooperative with our building.  Nonetheless, slowly, but surely, our first stall sectio...
30/10/2021

The weather has been extremely uncooperative with our building. Nonetheless, slowly, but surely, our first stall section is taking shape.

The weather has been extremely uncooperative with our building. Nonetheless, slowly, but surely, our first stall section is taking shape.

Hello all! I hope you’re having a great week. Once again, I need your help! I’ve been asked to write a series of magazin...
29/10/2021

Hello all! I hope you’re having a great week. Once again, I need your help! I’ve been asked to write a series of magazine articles regarding our adventures here at the new property, as we live in an RV and build a new farm from scratch. I’m having a little writers block though, I need some ideas. What specific topics would you, as a reader, be most interested in reading about? What would you be most likely to curl up in your favorite chair and read all the way through? Thanks so much!

Hello all! I hope you’re having a great week. Once again, I need your help! I’ve been asked to write a series of magazine articles regarding our adventures here at the new property, as we live in an RV and build a new farm from scratch. I’m having a little writers block though, I need some ideas. What specific topics would you, as a reader, be most interested in reading about? What would you be most likely to curl up in your favorite chair and read all the way through? Thanks so much!

If you’ve ever taken an interest in America’s wild horse, or considered adopting a wild mustang or b***o, it is likely y...
28/10/2021

If you’ve ever taken an interest in America’s wild horse, or considered adopting a wild mustang or b***o, it is likely you have encountered some of the strong opinions or accusations of animal advocacy groups. Below is an article I read recently by an advocacy group that seems to have found a good balance between the desire to keep the horse wild and free and the reality of the situation. This year, we are seeing unprecedented numbers of horses being rounded up. Tens of thousands more horses are being rounded up this fall due to the drought conditions, and the risk of starvation and dehydration to the horses. Although it is sad to remove them from the range, thankfully, some of the healthier horses will be returned to the range when conditions allow, to allow herd genetics to continue. For those that remain in captivity, Our goal as TIP trainers is to help as many of these horses as we can find good homes and a comfortable domestic life, Where they will never again have to worry about food or water.

WYWHIP has been on site for part of the observation of the Divide Basin Roundup. As an organization interested in solutions, we feel the need to set the record straight on many facts. Not much of what we are going to say is popular, but it is factual. WYWHIP seeks to inform the public on strictly facts rather than rhetoric, emotions, or drama despite the emotions our representatives encounter on these roundups. They are draining and sad, and hard to experience. However, we are the voice for the horses. We do not feel that any horse would choose to die of starvation or thirst. These horses are survivors. Their survival instincts are genetically anchored. They will mask injuries and illnesses so effectively that it is astounding. In fact, today, in discussion with the roundup crew, a story came up of a horse from this roundup who had a defect that would render a domestic horse completely immobile. Yet, nobody observing, nor participating in the roundup operation noticed a limp or mis-step until he was being loaded onto the trailer. There was still no noticeable imperfection of his gait, it was only the fact that something was horribly not right in appearance that stood out. This horse's hoof had grown so weirdly that he was walking on the short pastern bone, and the entire hoof was pointed backwards up towards the belly. The hoof had grown over a foot in length and was curved back into the back of the leg. Another roundup, years past, mentioned a mare who had scoliosis so severe her spine was in a "C" shape and she was nursing a foal. She could barely walk, yet ran into the trap. They could see something wrong but were not sure until they had her close enough to understand the scope of the defect. Yes, they survive this stuff, but at what expense? What sort of pain do they endure?

The checkerboard lands, where this roundup is occurring, addresses the fact that there are too many horses for this area to support year round. Yes, they share the range with livestock. However, the livestock is not out year-round. AUMs, different from AML considers what would consume roughly 750 pounds of dry forage per month. This equals 1- 1000 pound cow with calf, which is the type of livestock typically on the range. It equals 1.25 horses, or .20 mature sheep. If you want to view the comparisons of wildlife, or other livestock, click on this link. http://wyoextension.org/publications/html/B1320 and consider that there are hundreds of deer, antelope and elk also on these lands. Aside from the AUM differences, the checkerboard lands are alternating private and BLM sections, forming a checkerboard pattern 20 miles north and south of the railraod which parallels interstate 80. Most of the water is found on private sections, and there is no way to fence horses on the BLM lands without confining them to TOO SMALL of a space to live out year round. The forage requires the ability to move and find it. Water requires movement to find it. Shelter from storms - winds which rage up to 80mph, and even sometimes beyond that, in addition to snow and rain require the ability of the horse to range several miles to find adequate shelter from these types of weather patterns, which can come from any direction. One section of land, 640 acres (one square section of the alternating checkerboard sections) is equal to one square mile.

Now let's look at it a little differently- it takes between 80-120 acres of the arid high desert lands to support one horse. A 640 acre section will only support 5.3 horses. So this means, you would have to split family bands up to be around 5 horses per family. How would it work to manage this on these lands? If private landowners fenced their lands to prevent the horses from "trespassing" you prevent natural movement to accommodate natural horse behaviors, and the ability to find enough to eat and drink!

Ranchers provide water for all things living on the land. This is not cheap. Yes, those leases are cheap! But, the rancher is also drilling a well to ensure that the livestock move around and don't put so m much stress on the land immediately surround water sources. There ARE in good years, natural water sources in the high desert from runoff and rain collecting in reservoirs and drainages. However, the addition of the wells ensures that the water remains consistent throughout the year. All of that is at a rancher's expense for which they are never compensated. The average well is around $60,000 to drill, often closer to $80,000 in this area of high desert landscape. It costs thousands of additional dollars per year to maintain the wells collectively. Livestock is on the range from between 3 to 6 months only.

Sagebrush holds moisture for the grasses to grow by acting as a snow fence in the winter months. Snow collects around sage and rabbit brush and other shrubs on the desert, and holds that moisture close. The taproots are very deep, but the plants are fragile. They shelter the grasses, and allow them to thrive. When people drive over or disrupt the shrubs, they are literally killing about a pound of forage for an animal per brushy plant they damage (remember it takes 750 pounds of forage for an animal unit to survive per month?) and most people observing and photographing horses do not understand this. Ranchers maintain and utilize roads that are not going to disrupt the valuable forage for ALL animals. We are not even going to discuss the impacts to other animals or species with regards to damages to the plants in this post.

The roundups are open to the public. We invite people to attend and learn. We are willing to be there to answer questions, if you want, and ask us. We have jobs so it does require coordination. But we are very happy to show you all of these things in person!

Today was a hard day, there were two fatalities. One was a horse that probably had a defective heart. It ran into the trap and laid down. When the wranglers went back to check on it, it was unable to get up and died right there in front of them. The other was a horse who was fighting the panels, and hit one in such a way that it died immediately. These things happen, but honestly, anyone who has owned large animals can experience such tragedies.

To close, we are posting one photo that depicts one run of the roundup today, where the 62 wild horses - 12 stallions, 34 mares, and 16 foals were rounded up today. Some of the luckiest will be returned, to further the hardiness of the herds. The BLM chooses to return those that will keep them the healthiest, after applying fertility control measures to prevent immediate herd growth and reduce the need for a roundup in the next few years. This includes the use of PZP, and IUDs in the mares. They are checking every mare removed from the range for pregnancy before selecting the mares to receive an IUD. ONLY those mares who are open will receive an IUD, but those mares will be returned to the range.

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We're so proud to welcome Red G*te Farm to our Cavallo Community! They train and adopt out mustangs, and they also have a functioning farm powered by draft horses! We highly recommend following them to see what they get up to! :)
They're really doing it! A simpler life, producing their own chemical-free food on their draft horse-powered farm! Lots of work, but lots of rewards to be had, and the Londigran Family wouldn't have it any other way. Thanks for making us your boot of choice, Red G*te Farm, it's a true honor.
Danielle Londrigan Couldn't Bear to Send this Horse Back... Danielle set out to buy a workhorse for Red G*te Farm. She was presented with a sadly neglected animal that not only was in no shape to work, but that she wasn't even sure could be saved! This video is the story of a horse-savvy woman who just couldn't turn a horse away, knowing she was its only chance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gtxvGPVHqLA About Danielle Londrigan and the Red G*te Farm Family: When Danielle and her family decided to start up a draft horse-powered farm a few years ago, many folks who knew them thought they had lost their minds! They worked to combine Danielle's experience as a vet tech and horse trainer, and her degree in farm business management along with her husband Sean's business and engineering background. These skills, bound with research gathered about natural, chemical, and drug-free farming gave them a good start. Danielle believes that the horse was created with an amazing hoof, which provides all the support, cushion, traction, and blood-pumping action required. And that, if not used properly, metal shoes and hoof nails can damage hooves over time and cause lameness in a horse. They allow their horses to run barefoot to ensure their hooves stay in the best condition possible. However, if more protection is required, they prefer to use Cavallo Boots as they can be removed when not working.
1st ride! Come on out & enjoy a ride around the lake with Red G*te Farm. #winterlandholidaylights #hrz #horses #santa
Tonight's Red G*te Farm horse-drawn carriage rides have been CANCELLED, due to shifting heat/humidity which can be harmful to the horses, coupled with the potentially severe weather headed our way. They apologize for any inconvenience and weather-willing, will you see back downtown next Friday night!
What better way to spend a summer evening than in a horse drawn carriage ride through Downtown Springfield? Red G*te Farm is offering carriage rides on Friday evenings from 5:30-9:00 through July and August. The rides are $50 for a thirty-minute long ride through Downtown Springfield, including the Lincoln Home National Historic Site. Make sure to reserve your spot for the opportunity to experience Springfield in a new way!
What better way to spend a summer evening than in a horse drawn carriage ride through Downtown Springfield? Red G*te Farm is offering carriage rides on Friday evenings from 5:30-9:00 through July and August.
What better way to spend a summer evening than in a horse drawn carriage ride through Downtown Springfield? Red G*te Farm is offering carriage rides on Friday evenings from 5:30-9:00 through July and August.
GOOD MORNING FROM NM
Thank you for beautiful ride
A beautiful ride, thsnk you