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CW Native Plant Farm

CW Native Plant Farm The CW Native Plant Farm is a family-owned farm focused on native plants for restoration, environmental sustainability and resiliency in a changing climate.

The farm offers trees, bushes and perennials native to the WNY area.

Temporarily closed

10/22/2022

New perennials and bushes arrived today in the nursery.

We will be at Harvest Fest tonight at Kenton school district.
10/20/2022

We will be at Harvest Fest tonight at Kenton school district.

We will be at the Hamburg Fairgrounds as CW Native Botanika for their fall pop up this Saturday. New wickless candles, g...
10/18/2022

We will be at the Hamburg Fairgrounds as CW Native Botanika for their fall pop up this Saturday. New wickless candles, great skin care and nature inspired art.

https://www.cwnativebotanicals.com

New to the nursery is Red Spruce. The Red Spruce (Picea rubens) is a medium-sized evergreen conifer that grows in cool, ...
10/16/2022

New to the nursery is Red Spruce.

The Red Spruce (Picea rubens) is a medium-sized evergreen conifer that grows in cool, boreal forests of the northeast, including the Adirondack Mountains. This species is the conifer species most typical of the Adirondack region as a whole. Early records suggest that the Red Spruce constituted a quarter of the forest cover in the northern Adirondacks at one time.

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Tree
Leaf Retention: Evergreen
Leaf Complexity: Simple
Breeding System: Flowers Unisexual , Monoecious
Fruit Type: Cone
Size Notes: Up to about 130 feet tall.
Leaf: Green
Fruit: Red, Brown
Bloom Information

Bloom Color: Red , Yellow
Bloom Time: Apr
Distribution

USA: CT , DE , MA , MD , ME , NC , NH , NJ , NY , PA , TN , VA , VT , WV
Canada: NB , NL , NS , ON , PE , QC
Native Distribution: P.E.I. to s.e. Ont., s. to CT & NY; also mts. to NC & TN
Native Habitat: Wooded, upland slopes
Growing Conditions

Water Use: Medium
Light Requirement: Sun , Shade
Soil Moisture: Dry , Moist
Soil pH: Acidic (pH

We have paw paws.
10/15/2022

We have paw paws.

We will be there for The closing day of Pendleton Station Market. Then we will be at vendor events for most of the winte...
10/15/2022

We will be there for The closing day of Pendleton Station Market. Then we will be at vendor events for most of the winter with CW Native Botanika.

For two years now we have been driving to Pennsylvania for trees and each year has been quite a bombardment of spotted l...
10/15/2022

For two years now we have been driving to Pennsylvania for trees and each year has been quite a bombardment of spotted lantern flies. It was like one of those horror movies which millions of insects flying on you and in in your hair.
This year we found only one - same time of year - same location. Why I asked - I was told that the bird population had decided they are a tasty treat.
Fortunately this happens sometimes. Now if only we can get a few birds in WNY to get on board with eating gypsy moths I’d be a happy woman.

Sorry I have not been posting the last few days. We have a new puppy and the place is in chaos. Meet the new mascot. Wil...
10/15/2022

Sorry I have not been posting the last few days. We have a new puppy and the place is in chaos. Meet the new mascot. Willow

I will be looking to add maple leaf viburnum to the nursery for next year. Maple-leaf arrow-wood is a low, densely branc...
10/15/2022

I will be looking to add maple leaf viburnum to the nursery for next year.

Maple-leaf arrow-wood is a low, densely branched shrub, 4-6 ft. tall and 3-4 ft. wide. Flat-topped clusters of white flowers are followed by berries turning from red to blue-black. Bright- to dark-green, deciduous foliage, maple-like in shape, is very colorful in fall. A shrub with maple-like leaves and small, white flowers or uniform size in flat topped clusters.

The distinctive, purplish-pink autumn foliage makes this one of our handsomest shrubs. Another native Viburnum with 3-lobed leaves, Cranberry Viburnum (V. opulus var. americanum), has large, showy, white, sterile outer flowers in each cluster and in late summer and autumn bears red fruits suitable for jam. Few-flowered Cranberry Bush (V. edule), with red fruit and only slightly lobed leaves, occurs at high elevations in the Northeast, extending far north into Canada.

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIAC

10/14/2022

What I love to see is the birds who are happily living their life on the property while I rarely see them at the feeders. It’s because they are finding all the food they need for themselves and their offspring.
This song sparrow is loving in the rose bushes for protection. It was a rare opportunity to observe it just being a song sparrow.

Leaf footed bug. Not to be confused with the exotic invasive stink bug. FamilyCoreidae (leaf-footed bugs) in order Hemip...
10/09/2022

Leaf footed bug. Not to be confused with the exotic invasive stink bug.

Family
Coreidae (leaf-footed bugs) in order Hemiptera (true bugs)

Description
Leaf-footed bugs are a family of plant-eating true bugs that are named for the flattened, leaflike extensions that many have on their hind legs. Good flyers, they usually make a noisy buzzing as they fly. When disturbed, many species give off a bad odor in defense. They are usually dark colored, though some are tan, orange, or yellowish, and may have contrasting colors.

https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/leaf-footed-bugs

Subscribe and stay informed of our presentations, events and sales.
10/08/2022

Subscribe and stay informed of our presentations, events and sales.

Asters.
10/07/2022

Asters.

10/06/2022

It is hard to imagine the sheer number of pollinators on late blooming asters. It is a crucial plant for pollinators that overwinter and migrate. Diversity of asters ensures a long bloom time.

One more post because this is critical. Cultivars are not the same. I have cultivars, nativars and natives on my 10 acre...
10/06/2022

One more post because this is critical. Cultivars are not the same. I have cultivars, nativars and natives on my 10 acres. Woody species, perennials and exotic annuals (calendula, dahlias, zinnias) in my containers.
Outside of the annuals in the spring - the natives are the most attractive to pollinators. Asters for example. I had a New York aster from a local nursery and the straight native. The native was covered in pollinators while the cultivated native had one or two.
Black willow - I have the straight native and one I bought from a local nursery. Nothing was changed for the cultivated willow but I have never found a viceroy butterfly on the cultivated willow.
Not all cultivars/nativars are the same. One butterfly w**d nativar is butterfly w**d for clay. The only change is it has adapted to live in clay which most butterfly w**d cannot. For Wny that is a good thing because many of us have nothing but clay.
Telling gardeners that some cultivars are ok and some are not but not providing the real guidance they need to purchase quality natives when they want to help the environment is inappropriate.
I say this not because I own a native plant nursery. I say this because I have been gardening with natives for 20+ years and have observed this for myself.
I purchased the property in Newstead to see for myself whether natives matter. I started the nursery because I was so disappointed that the cultivated plants I purchased to help the environment were not all that beneficial.

“Back in my ornamental gardening days, I wanted the latest, greatest, most elaborate flowers I could find, so I followed...
10/05/2022

“Back in my ornamental gardening days, I wanted the latest, greatest, most elaborate flowers I could find, so I followed the advice of so many garden books: Choose cultivars – in other words, those (generally more expensive) “named varieties,” such as this variety of an expensive daylily cultivar.

Now,

as a habitat gardener, I avoid them.”

https://ourhabitatgarden.org/home/plants/cultivars/

Are all cultivars are bad? Or individual cultivars as beneficial as the straight native? How do gardeners know what to b...
10/05/2022

Are all cultivars are bad? Or individual cultivars as beneficial as the straight native? How do gardeners know what to buy to help the environment?
Tallamy’s research in the area of cultivars is clear - at best, some cultivars are as good or nearly as good as the straight native. Cultivars need to be evaluated individually.
However, Gardeners are not going to query the science to see if the cultivar has quality nectar (cultivars can reduce the quality), will the cultivar be attractive as a host plant (many cultivars change the native so dramatically that it is unavailable as a host plant), will it be as attractive to pollinators (most cultivars are not), will the cultivar escape and cross breed with the native changing wild populations (Russell lupine has made native populations unavailable as a host plant for kerner blue butterflies).

“What her (Dr Anne White’s) studies have revealed is that the more manipulated the cultivars became, the less attractive they became to pollinators. Therefore, if considering native cultivars for use in a pollinator garden, open pollinated seed-grown “selections” or “sports” (naturally occurring mutations) are the best choices. Cultivars that differ significantly in color and morphology from the native species should be used cautiously. (Morphology is a study of the form of things. In plants, it includes the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and fruits.) White hypothesized that color differences and decreased nectar and pollen production in hybridized cultivars are the leading factors. However, she also cautioned that cultivars should be evaluated individually.”

I stand by my original opinion. If you want to help the ecosystem - plant the straight native. If you want to plant it for yourself - please be mindful of the damage cultivated plants has done to the environment. Pick a cultivated plant that won’t escape your yard.

https://piedmontmastergardeners.org/article/native-species-or-cultivars-of-native-plants-does-it-matter/

Address

12288 Tonawanda Creek Road
Akron, NY
14001

Opening Hours

9am - 12pm

Telephone

(716) 417-2626

Products

Native plants and trees

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Comments

New perennials and bushes arrived today in the nursery.

We will be at Harvest Fest tonight at Kenton school district.

We will be at the Hamburg Fairgrounds as CW Native Botanika for their fall pop up this Saturday. New wickless candles, great skin care and nature inspired art.

https://www.cwnativebotanicals.com

New to the nursery is Red Spruce.

The Red Spruce (Picea rubens) is a medium-sized evergreen conifer that grows in cool, boreal forests of the northeast, including the Adirondack Mountains. This species is the conifer species most typical of the Adirondack region as a whole. Early records suggest that the Red Spruce constituted a quarter of the forest cover in the northern Adirondacks at one time.

Duration: Perennial
Habit: Tree
Leaf Retention: Evergreen
Leaf Complexity: Simple
Breeding System: Flowers Unisexual , Monoecious
Fruit Type: Cone
Size Notes: Up to about 130 feet tall.
Leaf: Green
Fruit: Red, Brown
Bloom Information

Bloom Color: Red , Yellow
Bloom Time: Apr
Distribution

USA: CT , DE , MA , MD , ME , NC , NH , NJ , NY , PA , TN , VA , VT , WV
Canada: NB , NL , NS , ON , PE , QC
Native Distribution: P.E.I. to s.e. Ont., s. to CT & NY; also mts. to NC & TN
Native Habitat: Wooded, upland slopes
Growing Conditions

Water Use: Medium
Light Requirement: Sun , Shade
Soil Moisture: Dry , Moist
Soil pH: Acidic (pH
We have paw paws.

We will be there for The closing day of Pendleton Station Market. Then we will be at vendor events for most of the winter with CW Native Botanika.

For two years now we have been driving to Pennsylvania for trees and each year has been quite a bombardment of spotted lantern flies. It was like one of those horror movies which millions of insects flying on you and in in your hair.
This year we found only one - same time of year - same location. Why I asked - I was told that the bird population had decided they are a tasty treat.
Fortunately this happens sometimes. Now if only we can get a few birds in WNY to get on board with eating gypsy moths I’d be a happy woman.

Sorry I have not been posting the last few days. We have a new puppy and the place is in chaos. Meet the new mascot. Willow

I will be looking to add maple leaf viburnum to the nursery for next year.

Maple-leaf arrow-wood is a low, densely branched shrub, 4-6 ft. tall and 3-4 ft. wide. Flat-topped clusters of white flowers are followed by berries turning from red to blue-black. Bright- to dark-green, deciduous foliage, maple-like in shape, is very colorful in fall. A shrub with maple-like leaves and small, white flowers or uniform size in flat topped clusters.

The distinctive, purplish-pink autumn foliage makes this one of our handsomest shrubs. Another native Viburnum with 3-lobed leaves, Cranberry Viburnum (V. opulus var. americanum), has large, showy, white, sterile outer flowers in each cluster and in late summer and autumn bears red fruits suitable for jam. Few-flowered Cranberry Bush (V. edule), with red fruit and only slightly lobed leaves, occurs at high elevations in the Northeast, extending far north into Canada.

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=VIAC

What I love to see is the birds who are happily living their life on the property while I rarely see them at the feeders. It’s because they are finding all the food they need for themselves and their offspring.
This song sparrow is loving in the rose bushes for protection. It was a rare opportunity to observe it just being a song sparrow.

Leaf footed bug. Not to be confused with the exotic invasive stink bug.

Family
Coreidae (leaf-footed bugs) in order Hemiptera (true bugs)

Description
Leaf-footed bugs are a family of plant-eating true bugs that are named for the flattened, leaflike extensions that many have on their hind legs. Good flyers, they usually make a noisy buzzing as they fly. When disturbed, many species give off a bad odor in defense. They are usually dark colored, though some are tan, orange, or yellowish, and may have contrasting colors.

https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/leaf-footed-bugs

Subscribe and stay informed of our presentations, events and sales.

Asters.

It is hard to imagine the sheer number of pollinators on late blooming asters. It is a crucial plant for pollinators that overwinter and migrate. Diversity of asters ensures a long bloom time.

One more post because this is critical. Cultivars are not the same. I have cultivars, nativars and natives on my 10 acres. Woody species, perennials and exotic annuals (calendula, dahlias, zinnias) in my containers.
Outside of the annuals in the spring - the natives are the most attractive to pollinators. Asters for example. I had a New York aster from a local nursery and the straight native. The native was covered in pollinators while the cultivated native had one or two.
Black willow - I have the straight native and one I bought from a local nursery. Nothing was changed for the cultivated willow but I have never found a viceroy butterfly on the cultivated willow.
Not all cultivars/nativars are the same. One butterfly w**d nativar is butterfly w**d for clay. The only change is it has adapted to live in clay which most butterfly w**d cannot. For Wny that is a good thing because many of us have nothing but clay.
Telling gardeners that some cultivars are ok and some are not but not providing the real guidance they need to purchase quality natives when they want to help the environment is inappropriate.
I say this not because I own a native plant nursery. I say this because I have been gardening with natives for 20+ years and have observed this for myself.
I purchased the property in Newstead to see for myself whether natives matter. I started the nursery because I was so disappointed that the cultivated plants I purchased to help the environment were not all that beneficial.

x

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