Clay Bottom Farm

Clay Bottom Farm We are a CSA farm in Goshen, Indiana. Home of the The Lean Farm. WWW.CLAYBOTTOMFARM.COM WWW. The farm has twice won Edible Michiana’s Reader’s Choice award.
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Lean Book: https://www.amazon.com/Lean-Farm-Minimize-Increase-Efficiency/dp/1603585923 Ben Hartman and Rachel Hershberger own and operate Clay Bottom Farm in Goshen, Indiana, where they make their living growing and selling specialty crops on less than one acre. Their food is sold locally to restaurants and cafeterias, at a farmers market, and through a community-supported-agriculture (CSA) progra

m. The Lean Farm, Ben’s first book, won the Shingo Institute’s prestigious Research and Professional Publication Award. Link to Lean Farm Book: https://www.amazon.com/Lean-Farm-Minimize-Increase-Efficiency/dp/1603585923/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_14_img_0?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=2DXZY6EGVAFEH3XZHYT2

In winter we compost/seed about one bed per week for a continual harvest of greens. The compost is farm-made from local ...
11/27/2023

In winter we compost/seed about one bed per week for a continual harvest of greens. The compost is farm-made from local leaves, 1-2 years old, spread about 1/2” deep.

Three Cyber Monday deals (links in bio):
1. 35% off my new book, The Lean Micro Farm, when you purchase from the publisher The book tells how we downsized from 1 acre to 1/3 acre without taking a pay cut, and it offers a step-by-step guide to setting up a micro farm.

2. 35% off of the Lean Market Growing Masterclass. Use code LEAN35 when you checkout at our website. A step-by-step online course on setting up and operating a lean micro farm.

3. 15% off of the ticket price for Lean Farm Start-up, a two-day intensive workshop May 4-5, 2024, at Clay Bottom Farm in Goshen, IN. Use code LEAN15 at checkout on our website. (Applies to both regular price and student price.)

All of these make great gifts. Thank you for your support!

Just delivered cilantro and carrots to chef Oscar at Restaurante La Central, the only Central American restaurant in Gos...
11/17/2023

Just delivered cilantro and carrots to chef Oscar at Restaurante La Central, the only Central American restaurant in Goshen, IN, just opened. One of best parts of farming is the relationship I have with chefs. I sit down with chefs once a year, asking them what they want, when they want it and how much, using the lean genchi gambutsu approach (up close observation and listening). I use their answers to design the farm.

Please get out and eat at Restaurante La Central! The pupusas are terrific. 🙂

My new book is printed! I just received my copy. The Lean Micro Farm: How to Get Small, Embrace Local, Live Better, and ...
11/09/2023

My new book is printed! I just received my copy. The Lean Micro Farm: How to Get Small, Embrace Local, Live Better, and Work Less. Pre-order wherever you buy books. Pre-orders and reviews are the best way to support an author. Thank you to everyone who has already ordered the book.

I'll discuss the book and how we downsized from 1 acre to 1/3 acre without taking a pay cut on Instagram Live today at 4:30pm CST (5:30pm EST) on the Insta feed. Hope you can join. Or check out for a pod.

Here's a review from Jesse Frost, author of The Living Soil Handbook:

Oftentimes, the desire in farming is to open up more land, grow more crops, and get bigger. In The Lean Micro Farm, Ben Hartman doesn't just illuminate the enormous potential in getting small--for communities, for the environment, for the profitability of farms--he lays out a roadmap for how to achieve it. ..
As Ben eloquently demonstrates, small doesn't mean less, small can just as easily mean more. Small can mean better. Small can mean, in the immortal words of economist E.F. Schumacher, beautiful. More importantly, when the desire is to grow more and earn more, sometimes getting smaller is actually the answer. ..
I was delighted and a bit terrified to pick up Ben Hartman's new book, because every time I read something Ben wrote, significant portions of my farm change. And The Lean Micro Farm is no exception. Chapter by chapter you see the ways in which shrinking their farm has led Ben and his wife Rachel to a happier, healthier, more sustainable, more localized farm without risking income. Each section is filled with examples and strategies for how they got small and what it looks like in practice. It's well-written, thought-provoking, and potentially life-altering. I immediately found myself penciling out ways to make our farm smaller. ..
So fair warning, the book will change your farm.

Here I’m mulching the rhubarb (see my previous post) with smoldering leaves, a gold mine of minerals. The leaves are may...
11/05/2023

Here I’m mulching the rhubarb (see my previous post) with smoldering leaves, a gold mine of minerals. The leaves are maybe a month old, a bit matted so they won’t blow away. I’ve left spaces around the rhubarb so the new growing tips aren’t too smothered in spring.

I’m in the fruit orchard today planting rhubarb crowns that I sourced from an Amish friend. I started by laying down car...
11/04/2023

I’m in the fruit orchard today planting rhubarb crowns that I sourced from an Amish friend. I started by laying down cardboard to hold back the weeds, and I’ll cover the cardboard later with mulch. The rhubarb will act as an understory crop and should appreciate the dappled shade provided by the peach and apple trees. My plants are 3’ apart. Lucky to have work close to the earth.

Incredible contrasts these past two days between covered and uncovered, inside and outside. For growers (and home garden...
11/01/2023

Incredible contrasts these past two days between covered and uncovered, inside and outside. For growers (and home gardeners), here are a few tips that work for me, based on many past mistakes, for staying productive in the cold:

—I have become a row cover minimalist. To save time, cost, and hassle, I now only cover lettuces, using a thick blanket (ag50), and leave other crops go. Many, like kale, will often surprisingly bounce back.
—Most harvests from now on will instead be from an unheated greenhouse.
—For the past three seasons, I’ve not used row covers in the greenhouse except on a few of the very coldest nights.
—Instead, I harden off winter greens by leaving the sides open until late fall (about now) to gradually expose leaves to colder and colder weather.
—Final tip: It is much lower cost to stick with cold hardy varieties than to take Hurculian measures to protect summer crops in winter. Most productive in winter for me are spinach and Asian greens (especially mizuna).
—These are special times, as some crops die and others slowly emerge, death and life overlap. Enjoy!

Around the home garden fruit trees we’ve seeded fall greens. This is just outside the kitchen for quick harvest. The yel...
10/21/2023

Around the home garden fruit trees we’ve seeded fall greens. This is just outside the kitchen for quick harvest. The yellow is Tokyo bekana, followed by baby kale and spinach.

Fall garden is a field of greens. We complete our 5th season this year on this spot. It’s our 16th growing season. Here’...
10/03/2023

Fall garden is a field of greens. We complete our 5th season this year on this spot. It’s our 16th growing season. Here’s what’s in the ground: lettuce, spinach, kale, mizuna, cilantro, and carrots. Greenhouse are still mostly full of tomatoes for now. For economic sustainability, we’ve learned it’s ok not to do it all, just focus on the top crops and markets.

We grow all of our food on just 1/3 acre, so high-yield varieties take priority. These Margolds make great fall tomatoes...
09/25/2023

We grow all of our food on just 1/3 acre, so high-yield varieties take priority. These Margolds make great fall tomatoes. We do no pruning or tending at all after mid-August, just harvest from the plants as they grow into a mess. We added no minerals this season, just grew these in our deep mulch of 4” of leaf compost.

On the ground are first lettuces for winter harvest, just emerged. Our window to seed these is Sept. 15-Oct. 30, weekly.

My new book, The Lean Micro Farm, is a manual for growing food from 1/3-acre, with a simple compost-based system. I appreciate all the pre-orders. Thank you.

#

In a few beds, we are combining orchard and garden. Here’s how:…—We started with the deep mulch system (as we do for all...
09/21/2023

In a few beds, we are combining orchard and garden. Here’s how:

—We started with the deep mulch system (as we do for all beds) by adding 4” of compost directly to the surface. This compost is not tilled in. The surface was tilled before adding compost, to terminate the grass.
—The compost is made from leaves and garden residues.
—Then we raked it smooth and started seeding.
—We direct-seeded baby greens (spinach, kale, Tokyo bekana) and planted the perennials rhubarb and comfrey, underneath peach, apple, apricot, and hazelnut trees. Many crops appreciate the dappled shade of fruit trees.

My new book, The Lean Micro Farm is due out in November. It tells the story of our move to an urban 1/3 acre farm and provides a plan to sell $20,000 from your backyard. I appreciate pre-orders, they are the best way to support an author. Thank you! Link’s in bio. 🌞

My new book, The Lean Micro Farm, is set to be released in November. …The book is available for pre-order now. I appreci...
09/11/2023

My new book, The Lean Micro Farm, is set to be released in November.

The book is available for pre-order now. I appreciate pre-orders because they are the best way to support an author and make a book more visible to others.

There is a lot of fresh content here—about using Gandhi’s concept of Swadeshi, ideas from Small Is Beautiful author E.F. Schumacher, 80/20 farming, and a lot more.

The Lean Micro Farm offers a guide specifically for micro-scale and urban growers who want to make a living from a tiny piece of land. It is packed with lean tips for the home gardener.

Thank you for your support, and happy lean farming and gardening!

Micro-transplanting—this season, to reduce heat stress, we’ve experimented with transplanting younger and younger seedli...
08/28/2023

Micro-transplanting—this season, to reduce heat stress, we’ve experimented with transplanting younger and younger seedlings, some just two weeks old. We are finding that tiny plants, especially greens, establish themselves more successfully in extreme heat than typical seven-week-old seedlings, probably because there is less leaf surface area to heat up.

We’ve also used shade cloth heavily, typically covering plants for three weeks after they are set in.

Lettuces in the pics were started inside, under grow lights, in a conditioned room. Small changes—tweaks—can make or break a season.

First figs of the year! These are LSU Gold, with stunning growth. Fig growing tips for northern growers:…—For easier har...
08/21/2023

First figs of the year! These are LSU Gold, with stunning growth. Fig growing tips for northern growers:

—For easier harvesting, train your main trunk to run horizontally, about 2’ off the ground.
—Then train two leaders every foot along that main branch.
—The leaders grow in a V shape.
—We use EMT and wood stakes to train the main trunk.
—We use EMT (about 8’ above plants) and twine to train the leaders.
—End of season, prune the leaders all the way back to the main trunk, leaving just 2-3”. Most of the growth you see in the pics is new since May.
—For an extra crop, grow strawberries underneath!
—Our tunnel was unheated over winter, zone 5b.

More scenes from Louisiana. At the Tunica-Biloxi reservation in Avoyelles Parish, Ryan Lopez and Sam Valesquez invited m...
08/21/2023

More scenes from Louisiana. At the Tunica-Biloxi reservation in Avoyelles Parish, Ryan Lopez and Sam Valesquez invited me to see their newly-tilled market garden, where they plan to grow vegetables for the tribe, alongside culturally significant food crops like elderberry, persimmon, and paw paw. Tools in the photo were traded from the French, used for agriculture. Ryan and Sam's enthusiasm for the project is contagious...
I led a lean farm workshop in Alexandria to a room full of growers and start-up farmers. Third pic I'm with Julius Johnson, a new farmer, and Leroy Conish, seasoned okra grower. Leroy told me his lean motto: "A farmer should always seek out the highest and best use of a piece of land." I like that...
Final pic shows an impressive rice field at Jubilee Justice Black Farmer Rice Project, in Rapides Parish.

I spent a morning in Louisiana with this incredible small farmer. Kohl Carter  is raising cattle, hogs, and chickens usi...
08/19/2023

I spent a morning in Louisiana with this incredible small farmer. Kohl Carter is raising cattle, hogs, and chickens using a creative approach that blends smart breeding with humane animal treatment and nature-based management. He’s a citizen scientist. “If the animals aren’t thriving, something’s wrong and we’re not going to force it, we’re going to change what we’re doing.”

A few things I learned:
—He’s working to develop a breed of Mashona/Corrientes/Angus that is uniquely suited to the specific ecosystem of the farm.
—Mashona are relaxed and easy to work with, originating from the Shona people of Zimbabwe. Corriente are agile and efficient eaters on pasture, originally from Iberia.
—We talked about EF Schumacher and Small Is Beautiful. When any system—not just agricultural—tries to “go big,”problems creep in. By contrast, the benefits of small human-scale economic units are undersold. Kohl’s question: “What if, instead of 2,000 hens in one place, there were 10 hens in 200 backyards? How would that change life for the birds and the humans, and kids?”

Heritage tomatoes are a mainstay crop on our micro farm. They are fun and fascinating to grow—and sometimes infuriating....
08/17/2023

Heritage tomatoes are a mainstay crop on our micro farm. They are fun and fascinating to grow—and sometimes infuriating. 😊Here are some notes and thoughts for growers.

—A key for us, to save labor, is to transplant young small plants. We started these in 50 cell flats and transplanted at four weeks. No potting up. Young plants are easier to handle and they take off faster.
—We think that many plants dropped blossoms during the during the summer forest fires/smoke. Hard to know the impact of those fires, but production for us definitely dipped during that time.
—We currently use a two leader system, with plants 1’ apart, trained to two leaders. We use both qlipr and roller hook systems.
—After years of grafting, we stopped. We haven’t seen a benefit, perhaps due to better soil management.

tomatoes

A mid-season thank you to a fabulous crew and to supportive local customers. All of our food sells within 1.5 miles of o...
08/11/2023

A mid-season thank you to a fabulous crew and to supportive local customers. All of our food sells within 1.5 miles of our farm—we’re incredibly lucky.

Here is a 5-step plan for growing lettuce in summer.....1. Choose heat-tolerant varieties. We use Intercut and Rubygo, w...
08/01/2023

Here is a 5-step plan for growing lettuce in summer.....
1. Choose heat-tolerant varieties. We use Intercut and Rubygo, which we usually cut into a spring mix. Muir is also great.
--Seed May 1 for June 1 transplanting and July harvests (though we seed every few weeks all year). We seed into 6" h**p paper pot chains but 128-cell plug flats work well too. 68F is an optimum germination temp, though we simply use an air-conditioned room.
2. Keep young starts cool: we like our west porch (zone 5b).
3. Transplant young--large seedlings are prone to heat stress. 3-4 weeks is a good age. 3 rows per 30" bed works well though we do 4 rows on 42" x75' beds because this uses exactly 2 6" chains=no waste. 😊
4. Keep covered with shade cloth for 2 weeks after transplanting, especially June-August. We suspend the cloth with steel hoops bent at 90-degree angles. The straight sides prevent the cloth from touching the plants, which can kill them.
5. Mist four times for 10 mins on hot afternoons with a Wobbler head. This cools down the whole garden...
With these methods, we can have healthy beds with temps in the 90s.

Here's our program for jumbo beets:..—Seed April 10 for summer and July 20 for fall (zone 5b).—Seed one beet seed (which...
07/27/2023

Here's our program for jumbo beets:..
—Seed April 10 for summer and July 20 for fall (zone 5b).
—Seed one beet seed (which is really a cluster of seeds) per cell into 128 flats or 6" paper pot chains. Make sure seeds are well-covered (at least 1/4") and the potting mix is moist.
—Transplant them young--at 3 or 4 weeks old--6" apart in the row, 4 rows per 42' bed (or 3 rows per 30").
—The beets will grow away from each other in clumps of 2-3 beets.
—We don't till or loosen the soil before transplanting--this keeps nutrient levels higher, and beets mostly grow aboveground anyhow. The beds are well-composted and already somewhat soft.
—Cover young plants with a 50% shade cloth, suspended on wire hoops, for two weeks after transplanting. Helps them settle in.
—Let 'em grow! The longer you wait, the bigger they get.
—If cutting the tops, leave 1/2 # so they don’t bleed.
—This is a way to grow jumbo food on a micro scale. 😊

Here’s our cucumber program:…—start seeds May 10 for a June 1 transplant—Corinto variety—then direct seed every three we...
07/14/2023

Here’s our cucumber program:

—start seeds May 10 for a June 1 transplant—Corinto variety—then direct seed every three weeks, 3 total seedings in zone 5b
—transplant 18” apart into landscape fabric
—two runs of drip tape under the fabric—keep the soil constantly moist, cukes are a water storage vessel
—trellis up a hortinova net—for the most part, cukes do their own trellising but we help
—note the net is at a 20 degree angle to help cukes fall away from vines
—when vines reach the cross-tie at 7.5’, we push them over to grow them in an upside-down L, supported by twine run horizontally
—no pruning
—harvest almost daily with a pruners, then we sell in 15 # cases to restaurants
—they’re fun, easy, and a customer and kid favorite!

Here is our basil program.…—Start seeds in clusters of 4-6 seeds May 1 for a June 1 transplant (zone 5b, northern Indian...
07/11/2023

Here is our basil program.

—Start seeds in clusters of 4-6 seeds May 1 for a June 1 transplant (zone 5b, northern Indiana)
—Transplant 2 rows per bed, 6” between transplants. We use the paper pot method.
—Harvest just the tips, the top 6”. Best time is evening or mid morning when leaves are driest but not hot.
—Bag (for restaurants) in 1 # bags, with a paper towel to absorb moisture. Store at 60F, alongside the tomatoes.

We have an abundance of early season heritage tomatoes at Clay Bottom Farm available for bulk orders this week. We have ...
07/05/2023

We have an abundance of early season heritage tomatoes at Clay Bottom Farm available for bulk orders this week. 

We have 10 # boxes of heritage tomato firsts (best quality, no cracks or blemishes), $36/box. 25 boxes are available. 

We also have 15 crates of heritage tomato seconds (perfect for canning, freezing, salsa making or drying). Each crate has 25 # of heritage tomatoes, $28/crate. Order soon while they’re available!

Pick up on Goshen's south side, near Goshen hospital, payment required at pickup. Cash or check only, please.

Also: 9 shares still available in our summer subscription program (CSA) where we deliver a box of fresh food to your porch each week, free delivery.

Please email nicole (at) claybottomfarm (dot) com if you're interested in ordering or more information.

All set for Saturday market!  “Never drive past a farmers market. Go in and support humanity.” —Neil Young
07/01/2023

All set for Saturday market! “Never drive past a farmers market. Go in and support humanity.” —Neil Young

Tomato season! My favorite way to eat them: thick slices, drizzled with oil and sea salt, garnished with basil—and of co...
06/27/2023

Tomato season! My favorite way to eat them: thick slices, drizzled with oil and sea salt, garnished with basil—and of course fresh.

We concluded Lean Farm Start-up, our 2-day intensive workshop, yesterday. Thanks to an amazing group of farmers!
06/26/2023

We concluded Lean Farm Start-up, our 2-day intensive workshop, yesterday. Thanks to an amazing group of farmers!

Here are scenes from the farm tonight as we prepare for Lean Farm Start-up, our two-day intensive workshop. Looking forw...
06/24/2023

Here are scenes from the farm tonight as we prepare for Lean Farm Start-up, our two-day intensive workshop. Looking forward to seeing everyone tomorrow!

With the deep mulch system, a version of no-till, we start with 4” of compost applied to the surface. We don’t till it i...
12/08/2022

With the deep mulch system, a version of no-till, we start with 4” of compost applied to the surface. We don’t till it in, we grow straight into it. Then we add 1/2” of compost every two years to feed microbes and rejuvenate the soil.

Today we are skim coating in a greenhouse. Note how Desmond uses a shovel to grade the paths. We find that paths are easier to maintain if they are graded a bit. We leave paths open—without wood chips or straw, etc.—to save cost and labor.

We started our new 1/3 acre tiny farm out four years ago by adding four inches of compost to the soil surface. This is t...
11/19/2022

We started our new 1/3 acre tiny farm out four years ago by adding four inches of compost to the soil surface. This is the deep mulching method. This suppresses weeds and provides a loose soil and plenty of nutrients. Then every two years we add a 1/2” skim coat to feed the soil microbes.

Notice that going into winter we mowed old crops and then laid compost followed by tarps right on top. This lets the old crop, roots and all, feed the soil, too.

Here’s to tomatoes in November! …—My best tip for fall tomatoes is great ventilation—I’m sold on peak vents. I’m not hea...
10/30/2022

Here’s to tomatoes in November!

—My best tip for fall tomatoes is great ventilation—I’m sold on peak vents. I’m not heating the hoophouse in the fall.
—These are grafted Margolds on booster rootstocks.


There is only one day remaining of my fall 25% sale for the Lean Market Growing Masterclass. The sale ends October 31, and the Masterclass won't be available at this discounted price again until the spring. Includes a video series on building the greenhouse I grew these tomatoes in. Click bio link to join me in the Masterclass now!

Spinach season! Here are tips for growers:…1. In zone 5b, I’ve found it’s best to seed a patch every week from Sept to e...
10/17/2022

Spinach season! Here are tips for growers:

1. In zone 5b, I’ve found it’s best to seed a patch every week from Sept to end of Oct if we want a harvest before the new year.
2. To give tomatoes (the previous crop) their due season, I start with transplants. These are 6” apart.
3. I also direct seed using a Jang with roller F24x sprockets 11f 13r, brush med or high depending on seed size.
4. No need to till! This ground was loosened shallowly with Hoss sweeps on a wheel hoe.
Happy growing!

For a lot more tips, our online market growing masterclass is on sale now for two more weeks. Check it out!

End of season, cherry tomatoes. …To contain the plants and to give our kids a fun play space, this year we grew cherry t...
10/13/2022

End of season, cherry tomatoes.

To contain the plants and to give our kids a fun play space, this year we grew cherry tomatoes in the shape of a house. Today it gets demolished.

3 tips for great fall carrots:1. Proper spacing. These are bolero variety, Jang seeder roller x24 with sprockets 11 fron...
10/06/2022

3 tips for great fall carrots:
1. Proper spacing. These are bolero variety, Jang seeder roller x24 with sprockets 11 front 13 rear. 4 rows on a 3’ bed.
2. Proper moisture. We seeded into a moist bed and kept it moist at 2” deep.
3. Friends! Thanks to and friends at our June workshop for pitching in. The final pics show our June 20 seeding. Francisco, I hope you always go barefoot in the garden 👌. Gracias amigos

October is sale month for the online course, see bio link.

We are finishing our 16th growing season, and each year we try to simply our methods—to do less, but better, as   puts i...
10/05/2022

We are finishing our 16th growing season, and each year we try to simply our methods—to do less, but better, as puts it.

This season we used a 2-chain design for most of our growing beds: we seeded crops like cilantro, basil, lettuce, and spinach into 6” paper pot chains (see final picture for spinach in a cluster). Each growing bed, at 36”x75’, accommodates two chains. This kept our planning simpler all season.

Our annual fall sale for the Lean Market Growing Masterclass is happening now. The online course is 25% off through October 31. See link in bio for more information.

For 2022, I added a five-part greenhouse construction series to the Masterclass, filmed during construction. I've also recently added lessons on no-till methods, tomato variety selection, trellising, and a lot more.

The Masterclass explains in detail, in over 100 video lessons, how we earn a comfortable income from 1/3 acre of land. Hundreds of students from around the world are part of the class. I hope you can join them.

A view of the fall garden!
09/27/2022

A view of the fall garden!

My goal every season is to prevent a September jungle in the greenhouse, where plants grow together a big tangle. It’s s...
09/20/2022

My goal every season is to prevent a September jungle in the greenhouse, where plants grow together a big tangle. It’s still a jungle, but we continue to experiment with horizontal growing, letting crops like cucumbers and cherry tomatoes grow up and then over. These are cherry tomatoes trained to form a room.

Kale by September takes on the look of small palm trees. …3 kale tips:—Cabbage worms are a problem. We harvest weekly an...
09/11/2022

Kale by September takes on the look of small palm trees.

3 kale tips:
—Cabbage worms are a problem. We harvest weekly and spray weekly with organic DiPel Bt
—If worms are thick, spray 3 days in a row! This disrupts the hatching cycle.
—When plants die from a freeze, we don’t pull them out, we cut them off at the ground. Their decaying roots do a superb job of loosening the soil.

Fall tomatoes! Here are some tips for late tomatoes:…—For indeterminates (trellising tomatoes), top the leaders about a ...
09/02/2022

Fall tomatoes! Here are some tips for late tomatoes:

—For indeterminates (trellising tomatoes), top the leaders about a month before expected first frost. This lets the plants put energy into ripening remaining fruit.
—If in a greenhouse, close up on nights below 50.
—In October (zone 5b) we harvest when fruits are still a bit green and let them ripen inside.
—This variety is Margold, which holds up comparatively well in the late season for us.

Winter greens return! We are adding baby Tokyo Bekana cabbage and mizuna back into our Spring Mix. These were seeded jus...
09/01/2022

Winter greens return! We are adding baby Tokyo Bekana cabbage and mizuna back into our Spring Mix. These were seeded just 3 weeks ago. Tips for growers:

—I use f24 roller, sprockets 11 front 13 rear on a Jang seeder, rows about 5” apart
—These started out for two week under row cover, to keep the flea beetles off.
—I’ve found Aug. 10 to be a good date for seeding fall greens like this. Zone 5b. Look for three consecutive nights in the low 60s.

07/26/2022
Harvest. Sleep. Harvest. Sleep. Late-July tomato farm! A few tips for this season:…In the final pic you can see our simp...
07/24/2022

Harvest. Sleep. Harvest. Sleep. Late-July tomato farm! A few tips for this season:

In the final pic you can see our simple fertigation set-up: a siphonject and buckets of liquid k-sulfate. I’ve found that a gallon per week per 100 plants keeps them ripening well.
—You can buy k-sulfate at many farm elevators, or powdered soluble online.
—With heirloom and heritage tomatoes, harvest every day, to avoid cracking fruits.
—Make carts your friend. When setting up the greenhouse in the spring, we graded the paths and planned for turnaround space for the carts at the end of rows.

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340 Hackett Road
Goshen, IN
46528

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