Rivendell Meadows Farm

Rivendell Meadows Farm The nursery is closed until further notice. We are focusing our energy on growing organic berries and herbs.

11/03/2021

IN A TIME OF DESTRUCTION CREATE LIFE!
There is only one response to COP26 and that is to do what our governments and all the other big noises at the Glasgow summit will never do…Plant woodlands everywhere!
3 trees with under planting makes a mini woodland and habitat for wildlife…start small and build!
And if you don’t have a garden then pester the local council until they give in!
You are more determined and resilient than any politician because you are fired with passion to make this happen!

10/05/2021

The leaf season has started again in the Northeast. This year please forgo the use of leaf blowers. It will save pollution, noise and gasoline and it will help protect biodiversity. If you are really concerned for your lawn grass, simply go over the leaves with your mower. This is called mulch-mowing and it is the advised method by turf grass programs and lawn care organizations. Use a broom or a rake for the hardscapes, or an electric blower if you must. Leaves are an essential part of woodland habitat and a protective layer of leaves protect and feed native woodland plants, trees and all those important insects and critters we need for a balanced ecosystem. www.healthyyards.org

Here's How Bees and Butterflies See Flowers. No Wonder They Love Them!
09/17/2021
Here's How Bees and Butterflies See Flowers. No Wonder They Love Them!

Here's How Bees and Butterflies See Flowers. No Wonder They Love Them!

Humans are blind to ultraviolet light, but bugs can see it, and boy are they lucky! Ultraviolet florescence photography gives us a hint of how flowers look to pollinators. Insects see the world very differently from how humans see it. They can’t see red light like we do, but can […]

05/04/2021

May the Fourth be with you...

08/20/2020
Food Revolution Network

Food Revolution Network

Our global food system is broken. In fact, the UN estimates we have fewer than 60 years of farmable soil left on Earth.⠀

And many of us are concerned that governments, pesticide manufacturers and “Big Ag” want to control what we eat.⠀

However, there ARE solutions.⠀

And our movie “The Need to GROW” documents disruptive (and hopeful!) new technology that threatens to shift the balance of power AWAY from the global food companies…⠀

And into the hands of the people.⠀

If you’re passionate about healthy food and creating a brighter future for our planet, please watch this film (for free) right away:⠀

https://grow.foodrevolution.org/

Many deep-rooted corporate interest groups want this technology to quietly disappear.⠀

We can’t let that happen. ⠀

We WON’T let it happen.⠀

Which is why we're sharing our movie for free at:⠀

https://grow.foodrevolution.org/

The more people who watch this movie (and learn about these solutions)... ⠀

The more chance we have of leaving our children and grandchildren a green, healthy, thriving planet.⠀

https://grow.foodrevolution.org/

The film is engaging, informative and compelling without being preachy.⠀

It will give you hope, and inspire you to participate in the restoration of the Earth.⠀

Join us in making a difference.⠀

Watch the movie, learn about the solutions and spread the word:⠀

https://grow.foodrevolution.org/

How to Garden in Raised Beds on Pavement
07/25/2020
How to Garden in Raised Beds on Pavement

How to Garden in Raised Beds on Pavement

Raised beds on pavement is a strategy for gardeners with limited growing space. Learn how to grow food on paved surfaces such as concrete or asphalt.

Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy
05/31/2020
Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy

Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy

Soil microbes have been found to have similar effects on the brain as Prozac without side effects and chemical dependency. Learn how to harness the natural antidepressant in soil and make yourself happier and healthier in this article.

Rural Sprout
04/19/2020
Rural Sprout

Rural Sprout

Do you have what it takes to grow a survival garden yielding enough food to provide for your whole family for the whole year? Find out how to do it here:

Chelsea Green Publishing
02/07/2020
Chelsea Green Publishing

Chelsea Green Publishing

Maintaining soil health not only helps crops grow—it can prevent dangerous floods or droughts. Not sure how to do your part in saving the soil? We have 5 key principles to get you started.

Bringing back bigger, bushier hedgerows ‘will help wildlife and store carbon’
02/04/2020
Bringing back bigger, bushier hedgerows ‘will help wildlife and store carbon’

Bringing back bigger, bushier hedgerows ‘will help wildlife and store carbon’

Supporting farmers to grow bigger, bushier hedgerows could help tackle climate change and boost wildlife, it has been claimed.Martin Lines, chairman of the Nature Friendly Farming Network (NFFN), said a move from EU farming subsidies to paying farmers for “public goods” could herald support for ...

Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Soil Makes You Happy
02/04/2020
Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Soil Makes You Happy

Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Soil Makes You Happy

Soil microbes have been found to have similar effects on the brain as prozac without the negative side effects and potential for chemical dependency and withdrawal.

Flea Market Gardening
02/03/2020

Flea Market Gardening

Why Gardeners Live Longer...

Humans Who Grow Food
01/25/2020

Humans Who Grow Food

Meet Conor from Catskill Mountains of New York, United States 🇺🇸

“I left an IT job in a cubicle to create a homestead on a river. It did not happen quickly as it was very hard those first couple of years for me and my wife Kate. We were both driven by finding a connection to nature and our food and to make a better life for ourselves and our two kids born on the farm.

I always loved great food either in the restaurants in NYC, traveling or cooking for myself. It is an incredibly important part of life and being able to grow and raise the ingredients for myself and my family was at the heart of our decision to move out of the city and to the country.

Our farm is in the Carskill mountains of New York. The farm has 1.3 acres of growing space. We grow a wide variety of vegetables. Certainly too many to list but all the favorites are represented.

I practice no till farming that focuses on feeding the soil rather than the plants. I work to create the best environment for the soil life which in turn supports healthy plants which are resistant to pests and disease. Farming is hard work and seasonal so it is a challenge to find workers in an area of lower population.

I found that the current landscape of tools did not work well within my style of farming and thus I became a designer and manufacturer of farm tools. Other farmers agreed, and the tool company, Neversink Farm Tools, was born. After a decade of building our farmstead, we now teach others our high production, low till farming methods to show how to efficiently and profitably grow healthy organic crops on small acreage.

We now wish to share our farm with the community through dinners in our newly renovated barn and through videos of farm life we create. We hope to inspire others to either make the leap themselves to a country life or at least to eat great food in a beautiful location with family and friends.”

Facebook Neversink Farm
Facebook Neversink Farm Tools
Instagram.com/NeversinkFarm
Website www.neversinkfarm.com
YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCp6Ia4JPJTrEJbhQ31EBRmg

Humans Who Grow Food features stories of home gardeners, farmers and community gardens across borders and cultures.

Please help us connect with growers from countries that we haven’t featured yet. Tag people from Slovakia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkmenistan and Tuvalu.

Tell us your story: [email protected] or message us on Facebook.
Instagram.com/humanswhogrowfood
LinkedIn.com/company/humanswhogrowfood
Twitter.com/humansgrowfood

*Not a paid/sponsored post*

Humans Who Grow Food
01/23/2020

Humans Who Grow Food

Meet Niki Jabbour from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada 🇨🇦

"I caught the gardening bug early. When I was a kid, my parents always planted a summer vegetable garden; seeds sown the long weekend in May with everything harvested by early September. It was a small, rectangular garden with long rows, and wasn’t very productive, but it did teach me that food tasted better from the garden. By the time I was about twelve years old, I took over the garden, re-forming the rows into beds and mulching the paths to keep the weeds down. The garden became my playground and I never looked back, eventually studying Horticulture in university.

Growing food is my passion, especially growing food year round. I love being able to supply delicious, nutritious organic food to my family 365 days a year - even though I live in a cold climate in Eastern Canada. As a kid, our garden was a three month garden, but as I learned and experimented, I discovered that many crops were cold tolerant and could be cultivated into winter with simple season extenders like cold frames, mini hoop tunnels and mulch. Growing my own vegetables, herbs, and fruits, also saves us money, and allows me to grow many crops that aren’t available at local supermarkets or farmers markets like cucamelons, ground cherries, burr gherkins, and amaranth.

I love to grow everything! I go a little crazy when the new seed catalogues arrive each winter, circling every new variety or new-to-me heirloom. And because of that, I’ve had to expand my gardens every few years. Today, I have 20 raised beds that are arranged in a symmetrical design, which includes several tunnels and many trellises for me to grow vertical crops. Growing vertically allows me to grow more food in less space. I’m also a serious succession planter, always tucking new seeds or seedlings into the garden. As crops are harvested, more vegetables are planted for a non-stop, year round harvest. One of my obsessions is global edibles, and that has led to my new book, Veggie Garden Remix, which celebrates my love of world crops and unusual vegetables.

Veggie Garden Remix was inspired by my mother in law, who grew up in a small village in the mountains of Lebanon. I wanted to be able to grow some of the vegetables she used to enjoy, and I discovered that there were many awesome Lebanese vegetables I could grow; Cucuzza squash, bottle gourds, zaatar, purslane, and much more. But, one thing leads to another, and soon I was planting crops from other parts of the world, trying to bring their flavours to my garden.

For me, taking good care of the soil ecosystem is the key to a healthy organic garden. I’ve been gardening in my current soil for over 15 years, and have gotten to know it very well. I dig in chopped leaves and seaweed each fall, as well as my own compost and aged, organic manure. I also grow cover crops annually, and practice regular crop rotation. Because my soil tends to be acidic, I lime my raised beds every autumn to bring the pH closer to neutral.

My pest strategy is relatively simple. I maintain healthy soils to nurture my crops, use lightweight row covers to exclude insects like cabbageworms, handpick pests like slugs, and have an electric fence to prevent deer damage. I also include many flowers and herbs in my vegetable beds to entice beneficial insects like ladybugs, lacewings, hover flies, and ground beetles. Having a diverse ecosystem that supports these good bugs help to prevent outbreaks of insect pests.

Don’t be afraid to get growing! Many homeowners let the fear of inexperience stop them from trying to grow food, but you can start small with just a few of your favourite vegetables. Try planting a container of easy-to-grow veggies or herbs, or begin with a simple raised bed. As you gain a bit of experience, you can always go bigger. And, once you’ve got a handle on the basics, be open to trying new-to-you veggies. As a kid, I was a VERY fussy eater, but growing a vegetable garden led me to try new foods and introduced me to a world of global vegetables."

Facebook http://Facebook.com/nikijabbour and Savvy Gardening
Websites - www.SavvyGardening.com, www.NikiJabbour.com
Instagram - www.instagram.com/NikiJabbour
Twitter - www.Twitter.com/NikiJabbour

Humans Who Grow Food features stories of home gardeners, farmers and community gardens across borders and cultures.

Please help us connect with growers from countries that we haven’t featured yet. Tag people from Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Djibouti, Dominica and Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia and Fiji.

Tell us your story: [email protected] or message us on Facebook.
Instagram.com/humanswhogrowfood
LinkedIn.com/company/humanswhogrowfood
Twitter.com/humansgrowfood

*Not a paid/sponsored post*

Humans Who Grow Food
01/18/2020

Humans Who Grow Food

Meet Rebecca Ellis from London, Ontario, Canada 🇨🇦

“I am a PhD candidate in Geography at Western University who studies sustainable food systems. My M.A. in Anthropology focused on community gardening and my PhD dissertation is about the relationship between people and urban bees (both honey and wild) in cities. I am a permaculture teacher, a beekeeper, an avid gardener, and a community activist. I'll be giving a workshop 'Permaculture in the 'Burbs' at the upcoming Guelph Organic Conference in Guelph, ON which will detail my journey to grow food and practice permaculture in the suburbs. I'll also present a vision for how we might turn suburban neighbourhoods into thriving, healthy ecosystems.

I grew up on a small family farm, where I lived until I was 15 years old. There were things I didn’t like about living in a rural area, but I loved snacking on peas and carrots directly from my mom’s large vegetable garden and spending time playing in the pasture among the cows. As an adult, I have always lived in cities, but I feel a strong need to grow some of my own food. I need to touch soil, interact with bees, and eat food I’ve nurtured with my own hands.

Gardening is a way to co-create with nonhuman nature. It brings me into relationship with the soil, pollinators, wild critters, and, most intimately, plants. Community gardening, which I have also participated in along with backyard gardening, brings me into relationship with other people and makes me feel more connected to my neighbourhood. And then of course, gardening brings me into relationship with food. I source seeds from ethical growers, I nurture the soil without pesticides or artificial fertilizers, and I have a peaceful approach to ‘pests’.

I live in the suburbs of London, Ontario, Canada. It is the traditional land of the Anishinaabeg, Haudenosaunee, Lenaapeewak, and Attawandaron peoples who foraged and farmed in the area for thousands of years. The climate traditionally has hot summers and cold winters, although our winters have been unpredictable due to climate change. My growing space is about 8000 square feet, and I also participate in community gardening in public spaces in my city.

I am an avid composter, having three distinct composting systems: a three-bin system, a vermicompost, and a biodigester. I also mulch the vegetable garden beds with leaves in the fall. I try to return as much fertility to the soil as possible. In terms of pest management, I aim to create an extremely biodiverse garden, utilizing strategies to attract a diversity of animals. Birds, toads, snakes, and predatory wasps play an important role in creating a balanced, thriving ecosystem in my space. I intercrop my vegetables with flowers in order to attract bees as well as predatory wasps. In order to keep squirrels from digging up newly planted seeds and bulbs I use chicken wire. I also have dogs that never harm anything but do bark at squirrels which serves as a slight deterrent. In terms of weeds, I have some great weeding hoes. Some weedy plants I eat or use medicinally such as motherwort, broad-leafed plantain, and garlic mustard.

In the space I am in, we have a lot of mature trees and so the garden tends to be shady. There are some quite aggressive plants that previous owners of my space planted such as English Ivy, periwinkle, and running bamboo that have been challenging to get under control. I also had an issue with lack of space, as we had an in-ground pool. However, in the spring of 2019 my partner and I removed the pool, which we found very difficult to maintin, and installed new vegetable gardens. The kids (all teenagers) were kind of disappointed but I think they appreciate the homegrown food as well as the beauty of our backyard. In the city, there is lack of access to land for growing food, especially for people who want to grow food on a larger scale. There are also some restrictive bylaws, for example we are not allowed to keep hens in the city of London, something I would like to do as they are useful garden workers.

I feel a deep sense of interconnection with nonhuman nature when I am working in my garden. I love to spend time watching the magical dance of pollinators as they visit flowers. There is a feeling of delight, joy, and calm that I get from gardening. Through community gardening, I have met some truly wonderful people. Sometimes city living can feel very alienating and gardening, for me, cuts against alienation. I love eating food from my garden and knowing exactly where the seeds came from and how it was grown.

I am involved with many community initiatives! I have a blog and podcast about permaculture and also give many workshops and presentations. I am the chair of the London Urban Beekeepers Collective, in which a group of bee-enthusiasts cooperatively mange shared hives. I am the chair of the City of London’s Urban Agriculture Strategy Committee. I am a founding member of the Pollinator Pathway Project, an initiative that seeks to create pathways for pollinators throughout my city. I coordinate a group called Urban Permaculture London as well as a hyper-local neighbourhood-based garden group. I participate in my city’s Community Garden Advisory Group and am in process of helping to form a new community garden in my neighbourhood. I am also part of the teaching team of the Permaculture Women’s Guild Permaculture Design Course.

I know a lot of people feel very distressed about the state of the world right now. Through gardening, we can create spaces in which people, animals, and plants flourish. In doing so, we can get glimpses of other ways in which humans can live with nonhuman nature; ways that are regenerative, healing, and mutually beneficial. This is true even in cities and suburbs. Other worlds are possible!”

Facebook Permaculture for the people
Blog https://permacultureforthepeople.org - This site also includes information about workshops and public presentations.
Podcast, The Re-enchantment, focuses on imagining other worlds in which all beings flourish, amplifying movements in which people are transforming the world for the better. It can be found on iTunes and Spotify.

Twitter.com/PermaculturePpl
Instagram.com/Earthygrrrl
Instagram.com/lunchthief_ (Sean, who gardens with Rebecca and made the “Bee Happy” sign)

The link to the conference: https://guelphorganicconf.ca
Guelph Organic Conference

Address

4043 Creek Rd
Irasburg, VT
05845

Telephone

(802) 755-6349

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