Happy Farm

Happy Farm Happy Farm -- a private farm in Kintnersville, PA We are a real farm, not an online game.
(17)

09/17/2023

A simple cold frame / mini greenhouse using straw bales and polythene sheeting. Good to keep growing through the winter and next year the straw can be added to the compost heap....

Ground mustard seed!
09/17/2023

Ground mustard seed!

Scientists Spice Up their Mosquito Weaponry with Mustard USDA Agricultural Research Service sent this bulletin at 09/05/2023 10:56 AM EDT View as a webpage ARS News Service These mosquito larvae are eating a fatal last meal: the seed meal of certain mustard plants, which may offer a biobased approac...

09/17/2023
Moonset a few evenings ago
08/21/2023

Moonset a few evenings ago

08/07/2023

The indigenous Hopi people plant their corn wider and deeper than others for a variety of reasons .

Using and planting seeds that have been encoded genetically to be drought resistant, they will plant 4 to 5 times deeper then a conventional corn is planted. This is to take advantage of winter melt water that lies far below the surface. The plant sends roots even deeper to take on more water.
This genetic encoding doesn’t mean ”lab modified seed “ or “ bio engineered “
but it’s part of the selective breeding that happens over generations and in some cases , centuries and millenniums.

Diverse strains of diverse species around the world are genetically encoded to grow in certain environments and thrive. Drought resistance , salt resistance , cold resistance and pest resistance is just a few of these traits that have happened naturally, and have been selectively bred by man

Depth and spacing can depend on soil moisture at planting time, the field’s location relative to rainwater runoff and whether it is composed of clay or loam, among other factors.

Their corn is planted in bundles staging every 2 meters or about 6 ‘When the seeds are planted they sow about a dozen seeds. After the shoots have appeared they thin it out to around a half a dozen.

Their techniques are primarily dry farming which uses no modern irrigation systems. It relies heavily on summer falling rains. Planting near washes and using contoured farming methods they take advantage of water runoff, halting erosion .

None of the corn waste is removed but instead allowed to decompose on the soil.

The root clumps are left in the soil and are markers so they can stagger next year’s planting to reduce soil exhaustion.

The sandy top surface of their land X as a mulch which reduces excess evaporation and helps to control w**ds.

I toured many small grow plots like this during 2020 ( see my COVIDCATION pics from 2020 and part two in 2021 ) but I also saw nations like the Utes and others drilling seed with pivot irrigation too .
I also saw techniques like this utilizing drip irrigation that looked more like an amalgamation of both old and new
While modern agriculture still moves in modern ways , ancient techniques still prevail and continue to be used .

08/02/2023

Zucchini flour.Might be old news to some, but you never know right. With rising concerns on wheat costs just thought I’d share it.There’s probably fancier ways of doing this out there, but here’s how I learned. Easy peasy. Nothing to it.We love and make tons of zucchini flour every year. You may have heard it called Amish flour or troops flour before. It’s a Staple in Amish and Mennonite household for generations here. It was also embraced in the 1940’s during rationing.You let your zucchini grow, oversized is actually better. Large to extra large. Marrow sized. I peel mine with a carrot peeler, into thin even strips for less drying time. Or slide it through a mandolin for speed of prep.Run it through the electronic dehydrator or just thread it. . No large seeds if possible for finer texture. Everything else is fine. It must be absolutely dry. It’s essential. If in doubt always dry it more, any moisture will ruin it during storageThen run it through a food processor or hand grinder until you have a powdered consistency. It will be a marbled green looking power. Texture is similar to a good quality whole wheat flour. That is zucchini flour. Three large zucchini is about four or five cups for me finished.It can be used to replace 1/3 of flour in most recipes without any change to the finished products, acts as a thickening agent for gravies, great for breading fish but we really tend use ours for tortillas and bannock since those are our quick go to breads. It also makes great dumplings and brownies.Store in air tight jars , or we often vac pac oursFor us, we still purchase grains from a local family owned grist mill. So this is free, sustainable, easily produced on site and it has a mild taste. Most people wouldn’t pickup on it. It cuts our flour usage by a third . You can do the same with sweet and regular potato, other squash acorns, and pumpkin. I just find myself zucchini is the least flavoured. Plus we get overloaded by the darn things

07/26/2023

Cover crops (green manures) are a great way to improve your soil and reduce w**d pressure. Knowing how to finish a cover crop off can also be key.

Over half a million customers have chosen True Leaf Market seed company for non-GMO, heirloom & organic garden seeds since 1974. Vegetable Gardening, Sprouts, Microgreens, Flower Seeds.

Wild Greens: Field Mustard/Wild Turnip (Brassica rapa ssp.)One of my very favorites, the flower shoots are tender and ca...
04/17/2022

Wild Greens: Field Mustard/Wild Turnip (Brassica rapa ssp.)

One of my very favorites, the flower shoots are tender and can be cooked like broccoli raab. Snap them off as low down as they snap easily. Leaves and flowers are also edible.

The pasture here used to be full of it until one snowless winter the sheep discovered the tasty roots.

More info: http://wildpicnic.blogspot.com/2009/09/wild-turnip-brassica-rapa-ssp.html?m=1

Wild greens: Garlic Mustard:Tasty for humans, deadly for woodland ecosystems.Here in Eastern PA it's prime harvest (and ...
04/15/2022

Wild greens: Garlic Mustard:

Tasty for humans, deadly for woodland ecosystems.

Here in Eastern PA it's prime harvest (and control) time for garlic mustard, an extremely invasive plant in the Brassica (Mustard) family. It's second-year rosettes of heart shaped leaves have appeared and the flower stems are starting to shoot up. Eating-wise, they are at their most tender and edible now.
Control-wise, now, through the time the flower buds start showing white, is the easiest and most effective time to pull them, as you can just drop the pulled plants where they were growing. You can also mow now and again every time new flower shoots start to appear. Once the flowers start to open you need to bag and remove pulled plants, as seeds may continue to mature and the last thing you want to do is add to the seedbank.

More info on why this alien species is so damaging:
https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/united-states/indiana/stories-in-indiana/garlic-mustard/

I just discovered this seed company based in New Jersey, Eastern PA, and nearby states. They stock a wide range of uniqu...
04/10/2022

I just discovered this seed company based in New Jersey, Eastern PA, and nearby states. They stock a wide range of unique and locally-adapted veggies (including perennials), flowers, grains, native plants, and more. Some are selected varieties and others are mixes and landraces (lots of variability) designed so you can select your own locally adapted variety.

The Experimental Farm Network sells rare heirloom vegetable, grain, and other useful plant seeds to support our non-profit organizing mission.

This small Michigan Seed Company focuses on grains and cereal crops (including 7 varieties of upland rice), legumes, and...
04/10/2022

This small Michigan Seed Company focuses on grains and cereal crops (including 7 varieties of upland rice), legumes, and winter squash that thrive in the cold temperate areas of North America.

Empower your plant-based lifestyle. Grow your own staple crops. Our 100% Michigan grown, open-pollinated, Midwest adapted inventory includes: wheat, barley, rye, rice, oats, triticale, peanuts, beans, peas, soybeans, limas, lentils, chickpeas, favas, squashes, sorghum, millet, flax, buckwheat, sesam...

Brilliant! One of the barriers to growing most cereal grains to eat yourself is the lack of home-scale dehulling equipme...
04/09/2022

Brilliant! One of the barriers to growing most cereal grains to eat yourself is the lack of home-scale dehulling equipment. But if you are handy you can modify a standard home grain mill to quite efficiently rub the hulls off hard cereal grains such as wheat, barley, and spelt. Oat grains are evidently too soft. Check out this video:

How to remove hulls from grain. Visit our website to check out our full line of grain mills.https://www.lehmans.com/category/grain-mills

Soil temperature is more important to seed germination than air temperature is, so as spring begins to unfold it pays to...
04/08/2022

Soil temperature is more important to seed germination than air temperature is, so as spring begins to unfold it pays to head out to your vegetable garden with a probe thermometer every few days. I just treated myself to a nearly-instant-read electronic one, but a dial kitchen thermometer does the job too.
Mine read 54°F this morning, so I can start direct seeding carrots, radishes, turnips, and cilantro...and expect them to germinate in few days (radishes) to a couple of weeks (carrots). I *could* have planted these weeks ago, but in cooler soil they would have taken many weeks to germinate, so it would have gained me nothing but chilly fingers.
And I can continue planting and direct-seeding potatoes, peas, fava beans, onion sets, and arugula.
Check out this link for the effect of various temperatures on germination of common vegetable seeds. https://tomclothier.hort.net/page11.html

Lots of free webinars on setting up farmer stores, selling to local stores, and such.https://extension.psu.edu/shopby/we...
03/28/2022

Lots of free webinars on setting up farmer stores, selling to local stores, and such.

https://extension.psu.edu/shopby/webinars?cat=516

Engage in live and on-demand learning experiences from the convenience of your home or office by signing up for a webinar from Penn State Extension.

03/20/2022

Find out the best soil temperatures for sowing seeds in your garden. Different plant seeds have different preferences.

08/15/2021
Happy Farm open house tomorrow 3 - 6 p.m. Bring lawn chairs, blanket (and a picnic basket if you'd like to linger and en...
08/15/2021

Happy Farm open house tomorrow 3 - 6 p.m. Bring lawn chairs, blanket (and a picnic basket if you'd like to linger and enjoy the Farm). Also comfy shoes for walking on rough grass. Learn about the eco- community we are brainstorming.

Happy Farm is brainstorming how to become an eco-community. Join us Sunday from 3-6 p.m. to find out what's happening. P...
08/12/2021

Happy Farm is brainstorming how to become an eco-community. Join us Sunday from 3-6 p.m. to find out what's happening. Please message if you are interested.

Great article!
04/26/2019

Great article!

Biochar, otherwise known as charcoal, is an age-old method of increasing soil health. Learn more from expert Kai Hoffman-Krull.

Sorry about the unintentional detour into fly tying. Here are some cute farm pictures. And we have duck eggs for pickup ...
12/15/2018

Sorry about the unintentional detour into fly tying. Here are some cute farm pictures. And we have duck eggs for pickup this week, $7 a dozen. Message to reserve yours.

06/22/2017

Come meet some of our sheep!

04/04/2017

Local grassfed lamb: the perfect Easter Feast!
Easter Special: $1 a pound off legs! Reserve yours now.
Available, by appointment, at Happy Farm, Upper Bucks County, PA.
Prices per pound:
Rib/loin chops $14
Shoulder chops $10
Shanks $12
Leg, boneless (2 to 4 lb) $12 ($11 until Easter 2017)
Leg w/bone $11 ($10 until Easter 2017)
Stew cubes $10
Sausage (coiled; Country or Italian)$9
Ground $8
Organs $5
Bones (5 - 7 lb bag) $4
Message for more info.

02/11/2017

Looking for the perfect meal to share with that special someone? How about some tender, juicy Happy Farm 100% grass-fed lamb chops cooked with orange and thyme:

10 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
Finely grated zest of ½ orange
8 rib chops
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 tablespoon olive oil
Juice of 1 orange
1 tablespoon dry white wine
1 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves

1. In small saucepan, combine garlic, zest and ⅜ cup water. Turn heat to high. When mixture boils, lower to simmer, and cook until garlic is tender, 10 to 15 minutes.

2. Season lamb with salt and pepper to taste. Place a large sauté pan over medium‐high heat, and add olive oil. When oil is hot, add lamb, and sear about 2 minutes a side. Reduce heat to low, and cook 3-5 minutes longer, depending on thickness.

3. Add the garlic and its liquid, orange juice, wine and thyme. When liquid begins to simmer, transfer steaks to warm serving plate with slotted spatula.

4. Raise heat to medium‐high, and reduce sauce until it is syrupy, 1 to 2 minutes. Pour sauce and garlic over lamb, and serve with roasted veggies and new red potatoes.

Message us to set up an appointment to get yours here at the farm, $14 a pound.

We also have:
Shoulder chops $10
Shanks $12
Leg, boneless (2 to 4 lb) $12
Leg w/bone $11
Stew cubes $10
Sausage (coiled; country or Italian)$9
Ground $8
Organs $5
Bones (5 - 7 lb bag) $4

01/06/2017

Resolved to eat better in 2017?

Local peeps may be interested in our grassfed lamb, available by appointment at the Farm in Bucks County, PA.

Prices per pound:
Rib/loin chops $14
Shoulder chops $10
Shanks $12
Leg, boneless (2 to 4 lb) $12
Leg w/bone $11
Stew cubes $10
Sausage (coiled; country or Italian)$9
Ground $8
Organs $5
Bones (5 - 7 lb bag) $4

Message for more info.

11/02/2016

We have a few 100% grass fed Katahdin lambs going to the butcher next week and are taking reservations for the last few whole and half lambs. Your lamb will come to you cut to your specifications, wrapped in heavy plastic, and frozen. A whole lamb yields between 30 and 35 pounds of meat. You will pay for the actual meat you receive @ $8.00 per lb for a whole lamb, $ 8.25 for a half. You must be able to take it on or about Friday the 11th.

Just stay in a green pasture and off the asphalt!
05/07/2016

Just stay in a green pasture and off the asphalt!

Courtesy of Rainbow Page:

Address

Kintnersville, PA
18930

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Happy Farm posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Happy Farm:

Videos

Share

Category


Other Farms in Kintnersville

Show All