Johnson Family Farm

Johnson Family Farm We are a small family owned farm located in Bucks County. We specialize in pastured poultry and we offer farm fresh eggs.

We also offer a small variety of organic produce in season. We will be offering grass fed lamb and beef in the near future as well!

These are our full size cows. Grass is currently taller than they are. We are ok for now but we really need some rain!
06/07/2023

These are our full size cows. Grass is currently taller than they are. We are ok for now but we really need some rain!

Both babies nursing at the same time 😊
06/07/2023

Both babies nursing at the same time 😊

We woke up to a surprise this morning!
05/20/2023

We woke up to a surprise this morning!

05/02/2023

Someone is feeling spunky this evening 🤣

Little fluff ball enjoying the break from the rain!
05/02/2023

Little fluff ball enjoying the break from the rain!

Karen had her very first calf yesterday.. in the pouring rain. It took her about 3.5 hours, but she managed to do it una...
05/01/2023

Karen had her very first calf yesterday.. in the pouring rain. It took her about 3.5 hours, but she managed to do it unassisted! Mama and baby are doing great 😊

It’s egg laying season!!
04/12/2023

It’s egg laying season!!

Everyone is very happy to be eating green again! Time to lose those winter coats.
04/03/2023

Everyone is very happy to be eating green again! Time to lose those winter coats.

01/26/2023

Cruising with my boy on my side and Dreaming of spring and lush green grass. . .

This quaint little studio apartment has been completed. It offers large views of open pastures, A well suited porch for ...
11/19/2022

This quaint little studio apartment has been completed. It offers large views of open pastures, A well suited porch for enjoying sunrises. Complete with bedding and windows all around. It has a breakfast corner for chowing down before you start your shift. Nestled in beautiful bucks county this is the get away you've been looking for. All amenities included.
Just kidding, it's a dog house for our fearless livestock guardian dog. He works hard to keep the animals safe so he deserves the best .😁

Early morning breakfast line at the farm. 🌞
11/19/2022

Early morning breakfast line at the farm. 🌞

10/30/2022

Testing out the bale unroller I built. Feeding the cows in a line will help spread out the nutrients that they leave behind. It also helps build the soil by leaving behind what they don't eat, in addition it leaves behind seeds from the harvested hay.

Here's some pictures of our big beautiful boy keeping an eye on all of his animals. Oh and some glamour shots of our fem...
09/24/2022

Here's some pictures of our big beautiful boy keeping an eye on all of his animals. Oh and some glamour shots of our females 😉 The animals are thankful for all the nice green grass that the rain brought! Have a great weekend!

We have just processed our last batch of pasture raised chickens for the year. It's time to stock up on delicious health...
09/22/2022

We have just processed our last batch of pasture raised chickens for the year. It's time to stock up on delicious healthy chicken for your family dinners! Please send us a message if you are interested! Thanks!

We have a guest! He is staying on the farm for about 6 weeks. He's a beautiful bull that will breed our stock. Looking f...
07/23/2022

We have a guest! He is staying on the farm for about 6 weeks. He's a beautiful bull that will breed our stock. Looking forward to the future calves!

Ahh what a beautiful Saturday morning on the farm. We picked up 4 more sheep, including an all black one. Gotta treat th...
07/16/2022

Ahh what a beautiful Saturday morning on the farm. We picked up 4 more sheep, including an all black one. Gotta treat the future momma's with some flowers. We also have a second batch of meat chickens in the brooder. The calf is still a little skittish but I managed to get some shots of him and big momma.

I think it’s safe to say they’ve warmed up to us😆
06/11/2022

I think it’s safe to say they’ve warmed up to us😆

We have a momma hatching out some rare birds, so far we have 5. The Ayam Cemani is a rare breed of chicken from Indonesi...
05/29/2022

We have a momma hatching out some rare birds, so far we have 5. The Ayam Cemani is a rare breed of chicken from Indonesia. They have a dominant gene that causes hyperpigmentation, making the chicken mostly black, including feathers, beak, and internal organs. Some of the chicks will be for sale in the future. Please message our farm page to inquire. Thanks

The little man is doing great! Big mama is keeping a close eye on him.
05/25/2022

The little man is doing great! Big mama is keeping a close eye on him.

We have our first batch of 60 meat chickens in the brooder! They will be going out to the pasture in about 2 weeks. They...
05/22/2022

We have our first batch of 60 meat chickens in the brooder! They will be going out to the pasture in about 2 weeks. They will be ready for your families dinner table in 8-10 weeks. If you are interested in the tastiest nutrient dense protein you can get, send us a message to reserve yours! Thanks!

Big mama had a completely successful birth that lasted about 5-10 minutes. No assistance needed. Thanks to Corinne's imp...
05/20/2022

Big mama had a completely successful birth that lasted about 5-10 minutes. No assistance needed. Thanks to Corinne's impeccable timing she was able to capture the whole thing on video! We are so happy to have these events happening on our farm, it really brings it full circle and makes all the hard work worth it. 🐮

04/09/2022

THESE 9 ARE CALLED WEEDS, BUT ARE HEALTHY FOR US

Did you know that some w**ds we are always worried about in our yards and Gardens are actually good for you, and can be delicious if prepared properly? Be sure to identify the w**ds correctly (The ones described here are easy to spot.) Avoid harvesting from anyplace you suspect pollution — such as from vehicle exhaust, lawn pesticide or doggy business. And remember that edible does not mean allergen-free. Here are 9 good ones:

DANDELION
Dandelion is one of the healthiest and most versatile vegetables on the planet. The entire plant is edible. The leaves are like vitamin pills, containing generous amounts of vitamins A, C and K — far more than those garden tomatoes, in fact — along with calcium, iron, manganese, and potassium.

The leaves are most tender, and tastiest, when they are young. This happens in the spring but also all summer along as the plant tries to rebound after being cut or pulled. You can add them to soup in great abundance. Or you can prepare them Italian style by sautéing with a little olive oil, salt, garlic and some hot red pepper.

You can eat the bright, open flower heads in a lightly fried batter. You can also make a simple wine with the flowers by fermenting them with raisins and yeast. If you are slightly adventurous, you can roast the dandelion root, grind it, and brew it like coffee. It's an acquired taste. You might want to have some sugar on hand.

PURSLANE
If you've ever lived in the city, you have seen good ol' Portulaca olearacea, or common purslane. The stuff grows in cracks in the sidewalk. Aside from being surprisingly tasty for a crack dweller, purslane tops the list of plants with omega-3 fatty acids, the type of healthy fat found in salmon.
If you dislike the bitter taste of dandelion greens, you still might like the lemony taste of purslane. The stems, leaves and flowers are all edible; and they can be eaten raw on salads — as they are prepared worldwide — or lightly sautéed.

You should keep a few things in mind, though, before your harvest. Watch out for spurge, a similar-looking sidewalk-crack dweller. Spurge is much thinner than purslane, and it contains a milky sap, so you can easily differentiate it. Also, your mother might have warned you about eating things off the sidewalk; so instead, look for purslane growing in your garden, or consider transplanting it to your garden from a sidewalk.

Also, note the some folks incorrectly call purslane "pigw**d," but that's a different w**d — edible but not as tasty.

LAMB'S QUARTERS
Lamb's-quarters are like spinach, except they are healthier, tastier and easier to grow. Lamb's-quarters, also called goosefoot, usually need more than a sidewalk crack to grow in, unlike dandelion or purslane. Nevertheless, they can be found throughout the urban landscape, wherever there is a little dirt.

The best part of the lamb's-quarters are the leaves, which are slightly velvety with a fine white powder on their undersides. Discard any dead or diseased leaves, which are usually the older ones on the bottom of the plant. The leaves and younger stems can be quickly boiled or sautéed, and they taste like a cross between spinach and Swiss chard with a slight nutty after-taste.

Maybe that taste combination doesn't appeal to you, but lamb's-quarters are ridiculously healthy. A one-cup serving will give you 10 times the daily-recommended dose of vitamin K; three times the vitamin A; more than enough vitamin C; and half your daily dose of calcium and magnesium.

PLANTAIN
Plantain, like dandelion, is a healthy, hardy w**d as ubiquitous in the city as broken glass. You know what it looks like, but you might not have known the name.
Part of the confusion is that plantain shares its name with something utterly different, the banana-like plantain, whose etymology is a mix of Spanish and native Caribbean. The so-called w**d plantain, or Plantago major, was cultivated in pre-Columbus Europe; and indeed Native Americans called it "the white man's footprint," because it seemed to follow European settlers.

Plantain has a nutritional profile similar to dandelion — that is, loaded with iron and other important vitamins and minerals. The leaves are tastiest when small and tender, usually in the spring but whenever new shoots appear after being cut back by a lawnmower. Bigger leaves are edible but bitter and fibrous.

The shoots of the broadleaf plantain, when green and tender and no longer than about four inches, can be described as a poor-man's fiddlehead, with a nutty, asparagus-like taste. Pan-fry in olive oil for just a few seconds to bring out this taste. The longer, browner shoots are also tasty prepared the same way, but the inner stem is too fibrous. You'll need to place the shoot in your mouth, clench with your teeth, and quickly pull out the stem. What you're eating are the plantain seeds.

The leaves of the equally ubiquitous narrow-leaf plantain, or Plantago lanceolata, also are edible when young. The shoot is "edible" only with quotation marks. You can eat the seeds should you have the patience to collect hundreds of plants for the handful of seeds you'd harvest. With time being money, it's likely not worth it.

CHICKWEED
One of the not-so-ugly w**ds worth pulling and keeping is chickw**d. Identified by purple stems, fuzzy green leaves, and starry white flower petals, this w**d is a fantastic source of vitamins A, D, B complex, and C. It also contains minerals like iron, zinc, calcium, and potassium. Chickw**d (Stellaria media) has a cornsilk-like flavor when eaten raw, and tastes similar to spinach when it is cooked. [1]

Chickw**d nourishes the lymph and glandular systems, and can heal cysts, fevers, and inflammation. It can help neutralize acid and help with yeast overgrowth and fatty deposits, too.
Additionally, chickw**d can be finely chopped and applied externally to irritated skin. Steep the plant in ¼ cup of boiling water for 15 minutes, and chickw**d provides benefits similar to dandelion root. Speaking of dandelion…

CLOVER
Other than the occasional four-leafed clover hunt, this common lawn w**d goes mostly unnoticed, even though it is becoming popular as a lawn replacement altogether. Clover is an important food for honeybees and bumblebees, and clover leaves and flowers can be used to add variety to human meals as well. Small amounts of raw clover leaves can be chopped into salads, or can be sauteed and added to dishes for a green accent, and the flowers of both red and white clover can be eaten raw or cooked, or dried for tea.

MALLOW
Mallow, or malva, is also known as cheesew**d, due to the shape of its seed pods, and can be found in many lawns or garden beds across the US. The leaves and the seed pods (also called the 'fruit') are both edible, either raw or cooked, and like many greens, are often more tender and palatable when smaller and less mature. The older leaves can be used like any other cooked green after steaming, boiling, or sauteing them.

WILD AMARANTH
The leaves of the wild amaranth, also known as pigw**d, are another great addition to any dish that calls for leafy greens, and while the younger leaves are softer and tastier, the older leaves can also be cooked like spinach. The seeds of the wild amaranth can be gathered and cooked just like store-bought amaranth, either as a cooked whole grain or as a ground meal, and while it does take a bit of time to gather enough to add to a meal, they can be a a good source of free protein.

STINGING NETTLES
It sounds like a cruel joke, but stinging nettles — should you be able to handle them without getting a painful rash from the tiny, acid-filled needles — are delicious cooked or prepared as a tea.

You may have brushed by these in the woods or even in your garden, not knowing what hit you, having been trained all your life to identify poison ivy and nothing else. The tiny needles fortunately fall off when steamed or boiled. The trick is merely using garden gloves to get the nettles into a bag.

Nettles tastes a little like spinach, only more flavorful and more healthful. They are loaded with essential minerals you won't find together outside a multivitamin bottle, and these include iodine, magnesium, potassium, phosphorous, silica and sulfur. Nettles also have more protein than most plants.

You can eat the leaves and then drink the water as tea, with or without sugar, hot or cold. If you are adventurous — or, you can collect entire plants to dry in your basement. The needles will eventually fall off, and you can save the dried leaves for tea all winter long. Info by Christopher Wanjek

Please visit our THE SEED GUY website when you get the chance. We have 9 Heirloom Seed Packages on Sale Now, Non GMO, still hand counted and packaged, like the old days, so you get the best germination, and fresh from the New 2021 Harvest https://theseedguy.net/15-seed-packages

You can also Call Us 7 days a week, and up to 10:00 pm each night, at 918-352-8800 if you would like to Order By Phone.

***FYI--We still have good stock in our Heirloom Seeds, but we got behind from so many orders, so just had to shut sales down for a few days to catch up on packaging and shipping. Linda will post more of our 60 Variety Heirloom Seed package for sale on Monday April 4th at 9:00 am. Thank you. ***

If you LIKE US on our page, you will be on our list for more great Gardening Articles, new Heirloom Seed Offers, and healthy Juice Recipes https://www.facebook.com/theseedguy Thank you, and God Bless You and Your Family.

Last weekend was very eventful. We got the field aerated and seeded and put a deposit on some adorable lambs!
04/02/2022

Last weekend was very eventful. We got the field aerated and seeded and put a deposit on some adorable lambs!

The last week has been very productive. The fence is now hot, the chicken coop has been cleaned, and we've tracked down ...
03/25/2022

The last week has been very productive. The fence is now hot, the chicken coop has been cleaned, and we've tracked down a couple sources for sheep.

Happy First Day of Spring! Today is a good day to get outside and prep that soil for planting and start your seeds if yo...
03/20/2022

Happy First Day of Spring! Today is a good day to get outside and prep that soil for planting and start your seeds if you haven't done so already.

He does his own hair... in case you were wondering 😅
03/17/2022

He does his own hair... in case you were wondering 😅

Spring is just around the corner, I see some green emerging.
03/15/2022

Spring is just around the corner, I see some green emerging.

Don't Forget to Change those clocks!
03/13/2022

Don't Forget to Change those clocks!

As spring approaches, please remember to be kind to our amphibious friends. Frogs and toads play an important role in ou...
03/12/2022

As spring approaches, please remember to be kind to our amphibious friends. Frogs and toads play an important role in our ecosystem. Tadpoles feed on algae, cleaning our waterways and adult frogs help maintain the population of pests. They also provide a food source for mammals, fish, and birds.

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18930
Kintnersville, PA
18930

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