Emeraldale Farms

Emeraldale Farms Our family farm focuses on sustainable practices and the ethics of Permaculture. We are currently raising American Guinea Hogs and cattle on pasture.

Operating as usual

Celine did good today! Very careful mama.
08/25/2020

Celine did good today! Very careful mama.

Check out my herd on openherd.com.  It's a really cool website that shows my foundation herd with photos. https://www.op...
07/16/2020

Check out my herd on openherd.com. It's a really cool website that shows my foundation herd with photos. https://www.openherd.com Search for Emeraldale Farm.

Study: Elderberry Cuts Duration of Colds and Flu in Half
02/13/2019
Study: Elderberry Cuts Duration of Colds and Flu in Half

Study: Elderberry Cuts Duration of Colds and Flu in Half

Make sure your medicine cabinet is stocked with elderberry syrup this winter. Studies show it can totally eliminate cold and flu symptoms within 48 hours. Several studies have confirmed the immune-boosting power of elderberries. Studies from 2004 and 2009 demonstrated its ability to cut flu duration...

01/29/2019

We are working on something exciting for the fall here at the farm! Stay tuned.

02/12/2018

Establishing roots on Elderberry Cuttings
WATER METHOD
Place your trimmings (cut side down) in a mason jar and add water until they are halfway submerged. Place the jar in a sunny area for 6-8 weeks, changing the water often. Water roots are different than soil roots and need to be vigorous before soil planting. Spritz with water occasionally – elderberry bushes love a humid environment. When they’re ready and there is not risk of freezing temperatures, plant the elderberry bush into quality soil – the kind that you’d use in a vegetable garden – with good drainage.
SOIL METHOD
Place your trimmings (cut side down) in a mason jar and add water until they are halfway submerged. Allow them to soak for 12-24 hours and then transfer them to pots filled with good, organic soil. (Again, the kind you would use in a vegetable garden.) Keep the pots moist so that the cuttings don’t dry out. They need a humid environment to encourage growth, so either:
Place them in a greenhouse
Place a plastic bag over the top to trap moisture and create a greenhouse-like effect, then set the pot in a sunny area.
The trimmings will send out leaves and then grow roots – it can take six to twelve weeks to see significant root growth. The cuttings prefer a warm bottom and cooler tops. Once it reaches the 6-8 week mark, gently tug on the cutting to assess root development. Once they’re well established and there is not risk of freezing temperatures, plant the elderberry cane (roots intact) into the soil.

Root stimulant is not necessary for elderberry bushes, but you can certainly use one to speed things up if you’d like. Most store-bought ones contain synthetic chemicals, but willow water is a natural alternative.
Planting Your Elderberry Bush
Transplant the elderberry cutting into the landscape in the spring following rooting. Pick a spot that gets full sun or part shade (at least 6 hours of sun), with humus rich soil and good drainage. Dig a planting hole and place the new elderberry shrub into the soil with the base of the stem level with the soil line.
Elderberry bushes can grow to be 6-8 feet wide, so space your bushes out by 6-10 feet.
Make Elderflower Lemonade!
Seriously, this is a step. During your elderberry bushes’ first season you want to pinch off the flowers so that the elderberry can devote its energy to developing a strong root system. Use them to make syrup, tea or lemonade.
Next season you’ll be harvesting elderberries!

06/07/2017

Our broody hen has 9 chicks she's raising.
So fun to watch the 'mother hen'.

Emeraldale Farms will be selling pork at the Madison Tractor Supply Store tomorrow from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Hope to see ...
04/28/2017
Market Day | Tractor Supply Co.

Emeraldale Farms will be selling pork at the Madison Tractor Supply Store tomorrow from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Hope to see you there!

Stop by TSC for our Market Day featuring local homemade & homegrown goods for sale.

03/07/2017

Today I listened to a podcast regarding raising pigs. This particular farmer refers to his pork as 'Beyond organic, forest-raised gourmet pork. '

This is the kind of pork we raise too!
Our hazelnut, hickory, oak and beech trees are rapidly growing and increasing mast yearly.

I look forward to the day I can forego all feed from the store and fatten pigs solely on nuts.

Pigs have a need for the amino acid lysine in order to grow rapidly. Grains provide that, but hazelnuts are better. I say let the pig have the salad; I'll have the bacon!

02/21/2017

“Omega-6 is like a fat producing bomb...”

So said French researcher Gerard Ailhaud, commenting on the results of a new study showing that micemice fed the amount of omega-6 fatty acids present in the modern western diet grow fatter and fatter with each succeeding generation. In the picture shown, the mouse on the left was raised on the high levels of omega-6 fatty acids and low levels of omega-3 fatty acids typical of the American diet. In addition to being grossly overweight, it has the warning signs of diabetes. The healthy mouse on the right was raised on standard mouse chow. The two mice got equal amounts of exercise. The mice are the fourth generation to be raised on the two types of diet.

Omega-6 fatty acids are essential for health, but the amount consumed by most Americans increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Omega-6s are most abundant in vegetable oils such as corn oil, safflower oil, and cottonseed oils. (Olive oil is low in omega- 6 fatty acids.) Few people realize that grain-fed animals are also a major source of omega-6s. Meat and dairy products from animals fed a high-grain diet, which is the typical feedlot diet, have up to ten times more omega-6s than products from animals raised on their natural diet of pasture.

This study suggests that if we switch to food with a healthy balance of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids, we will be leaner and healthier, and so will our children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren.

Massiera, F; Barbry, P; Guesnet, P; Joly, A; Luquet, S; Brest,, CM; Mohsen-Kanson, T; Amri, E and G. Ailhaud. A Western-like fat diet is sufficient to induce a gradual enhancement in fat mass over generations. Journal of Lipid Research. August 2010. Volume 51, pages 2352-2361.

02/21/2017

ALA keeps breast cancer away

The meat and dairy products of animals raised on pasture are higher in omega-3s than animals raised in factory farms. The most abundant omega-3 in pastured products is called “alpha-linolenic acid” or ALA. A study of breast cancer survivors revealed that the women with the most ALA in their tissues—and therefore the most ALA in their diets—were one fourth as likely to have their cancers return as women with the least amount. Most women who die from breast cancer die from a tumor that has metastasized, not from the original tumor. This is yet another reason to eat cheese, milk, and meat from pastured animals.

British Journal of Cancer, 1994. Volume 70 pages 330-4.

02/21/2017

We have ground pork and sausage for sale. $6/lb. Pasture raised, no hormones or antibiotics.

05/20/2016

I have lots of thoughts on this issue. The guinea Hogs by far are the more efficient to raise in terms of outside input which equals sustainability. Sustainable livestock is one of my goals, not for any political reason but for practical reasons because Supply chains may not always be what they are right now. I have unregistered Hogs and I have registered Hogs. I will be mixing these Hogs. I am working hard to get very lines and increase the genetic variety. I have a goal to keep the COI under 4% I am going to many different places to get the genetics. I've been looking at a large number of pedigrees. After seeing these pedigrees I am no longer afraid to take my boar back to the daughters in an effort to create some new lines that are in my unregistered stock. My unregistered pigs very well may be closely related. So i cannot get a true coi. I need registered stock to have true coi numbers. I have 40 acres of pasture and woods, that are not yet big enough to produce mast. I have 4 cows that we are rotating across pasture every 24 hours. The agh are slow but they can clear and open brush. I have acorn, hickory, oak, hazelnut, and beech growing from regrowth. I'm hoping to have decent mast in 4 more years. I observed hazelnuts and a few acorn the last 2 years. So. I am thinking of keeping all my feeders and growing them on all pasture plus duck and chicken eggs. I may have my Jersey in milk by then as well. I hope to be able to do all this with an outside feed cost of $500/yr. within 3 years.
The ultimate goal to be feed costs of $0/yr. within 5 years.

Address

Hwy 311
Madison, NC

Opening Hours

Monday 7am - 11pm
Tuesday 7am - 11pm
Wednesday 7am - 11pm
Thursday 7am - 11pm
Friday 7am - 11pm
Saturday 7am - 11pm
Sunday 7am - 11pm

Telephone

(336) 423-3382

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